Why Plant Churches in the USA?

by Rev. Joseph Ezeigbo M.Div, Th.M | The Psalmist urges us to declare his glory among the nations, his marvelous deeds among all peoples. Ps.96:3

America, with her approximately 350 million people, has the third largest population of any nation in the world. Although this number represents only about 4.28% of the entire world population, it comprises the highest number of the largest ethnic and groups of people in the world. Further, America has the highest number of growing immigrant population in the world, thus making it the greatest mission field in the world. These are not new facts. Missiologists established these statistics more than a quarter of a century ago.

Immigrants accounted for 4.7% of US population in 1970 and rising to 6.2% in 1980 and up to 12.5% in 2009. Since 2000 America absorbs at least 1 million immigrants annually. (Note that this excludes undocumented immigrants).

Jesus, the Lord of the harvest, charged His disciples thus saying, Do you not say, ’Four months more and then the harvest?’ I tell you, open your eyes and look at the fields. They are ripe for harvest (Jn. 4:34). In His compassion for a desperate and distressed world, He urged them (us— ECWAUSA) … The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into his harvest field Matt. 9:37-38.

POLARIZATION OF THE GOSPEL
Though record indicates that about 30,000 Churches shut their doors between 2006 to 2012; a study reported by the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion states that there has been a general increase in the number of Churches in the US since 1998. The National Congregations Study (NCS) conducted between 2006 and 2012 also indicates an increase from about 336,000 congregations in 1998 to about 414,000 in 2006 and perhaps leveled off at 338,00 in 2012. The Southern Baptist Church(SBC); America’s largest denomination, has about 50,000 congregations.

However, consider that these overall statistics include those denominations that have become apostate (denying the five Cardinal doctrines of the Bible), including the inspiration of the Bible and authority of the Scriptures and ordination of openly gay and homosexual individuals.

In Africa in general and Nigeria in particular, the situation is more bemoanable. The seemingly out of control upsurge of the Neo-Pentecostal/Charismatic movement has become a reproach to the cause Christianity in Nigeria. Fake miracles, Occult practices, False and demonic doctrines, bogus titles by “ministers of God” (MOGs), excessive lavish lifestyles and materialism etc. (Reading material, The Seduction of the Nigerian Church by Gary Maxey and Peter Ozodo and The Modern Theology versus Biblical Theology by an ECWA pastor, Daniel Sopuru). According to Pew Research, Nigeria is the second most religious country in the world.

Apostle Paul stated the integrity that governed his ministry and should be the goal of every ministry in these words, “unlike so many we do not peddle the word of God for profit. On the contrary, in Christ, we speak with sincerity, like men sent from God” “Therefore, since through God’s mercy we have received this ministry, we do not lose heart. Rather we have renounced secret and shameful ways; we do not use deception, nor do we distort the word of God. On the contrary, by setting forth the truth plainly, we commend ourselves to every man’s conscience in the sight of God” (2 Cor. 2:17;4:1-3).

POST-MODERNISM (POST-CHRISTIAN) ERA
For those who canvass in Philosophy, this is an upgrade from the Age of the Enlightenment of 17th and 18th Centuries. Author and pastor David Roper gives the following description of this period: we are living in what many have described as a Post-Christian era. That doesn’t mean there are no longer many Christians around; there may in fact be more true believers than ever before. ‘Post–Christian’ era means that Christian faith no longer plays a role in shaping public opinion and policy. Christian assumptions and commitments once widely held no longer have the presence and impact they once had.

A new hallmark of this period is characterized by the rise the “Nones.” The “Nones” are the new segment of the American population who identify themselves as religiously unaffiliated. And they are growing by the numbers. According to a study, in the 1950s, around 3% of Americans checked the “None” box when asked about their religious affiliation. That number has grown especially in the last decade to 20%. This group, according to Pew Research Center, makes up for about 23% of US adult population. About 33% of Millennial’s population fall into this category. In the last five years, this population grew from 15% to 20%.

PORTRAY THE BEAUTY OF THE GOSPEL AND TRUE CHRISTIANITY
Paul’s admonition to his protégé, Titus behooves us. …that in every way they will make the teaching about God our Savior attractive (NIV) Tit. 2:10. The word attractive adorn (NKJV) kosmeo in Greek. The idea is to beautify or make beautiful in order to draw attention. The Gospel has become the object of ridicule and caricature in many quarters today for the reasons mentioned above especially when considering the state of the Church in both the United States and Nigeria. Judging by population and size ratio, Nigeria has the largest number of Churches and Christian population of any country in the world. United States and Nigeria are the two countries with the highest number of Church attendance population in the world.

May we aspire to spread the aroma of Christ as we are urged for we are to God the aroma of Christ.

PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL
The Psalmist urges declare his glory among the nations, his marvelous deeds among all peoples Ps.96:3. The Great Commission is preceded by Christ’s declaration of His possession of All authority in heaven and on earth (Matt.28:18) Contextually, therefore when we obey the Great Commission, we march under that divine authority and the promise of His company and abiding presence (vss.19-20). Also, the blessing of those who proclaim the God news would be abundantly ours (Isa.52:7).

Rev. Joseph EzeigboRev. Joseph Okechukwu Ezeigbo is a Bible teacher for the weekly Bible study at ECWA Maryland. He is also a part of the National Day of Prayer and the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted.



Biblical Mandate for Church Planting

by Rev. Joseph Ezeigbo M.Div, Th.M |It is through the Church that Christ intends to reign on earth, because the church is the visible manifestation of His mystical body . Eph.1:22-23. Col.1:18 (image: Grow Baby Grow, R. James Shupp).

The Biblical mandate for Church planting is inextricably interwoven with the Great Commission. This burden was uppermost in the Lord’s heart that it is repeated in all the four Gospels and in Acts.

The Church is not an afterthought but has been in the mind of God since eternity. Eph.1:4,;3:2-6. For this purpose we shall concentrate on Matthew 28:18-20. The apostles carried out this mandate immediately following the descent of the Holy Spirit in Acts1:5-8,2:41-47. The mandate spells out what should be the stance of the church.  “ A church on the go”. The Church is a movement not a monument. Not just a movement, but a missionary movement. Matt.28:19-20; Acts 1:8.

It is a transformational movement ( make disciples of the nations) Matt.28:19

It is an educational/teaching movement. ( teaching them…) Matt.28:20.

Greater Purpose

There is yet a greater purpose for the mandate to plant churches.

  1. To declare the praises of Christ for our salvation 1 Pet.2:9
  2. To declare His glory through a life of holiness Eph.1:4,6;1 Pet.2:10-12.
  3. It is through the Church that Christ intends to reign on earth, because the church is the visible manifestation of His mystical body . Eph.1:22-23. Col.1:18.
  4. The Church is also the fullness of her Head (Christ) Eph.1:22-23.
  5. It is through the Church that Christ declares His reconciliation with mankind and between mankind. Eph.2:11-22; Col.2:18-22.
  6. It is the Church that makes manifest the mystery of the ages and through which the manifold wisdom of God is declared to the kingdom of darkness. Eph.3:9-10.
  7. The Church is God’s designated change-agent in the world Acts 17:6;2 Cor.2:14-16.( I recommend Christian Counter Culture, A Message of the Sermon on the Mount. (Inter-Varsity Press) by John Stott. Kingdom Disciples ( Moody Publishers) by Tony Evans.

First Century Examples

a. The early Christians obeyed this mandate Acts 8:4-7;11:19-21.

b. The apostle Paul carried out this mandate as he traveled and evangelized the Mediterranean world.Acts 14:21-23;16-20;1 Tim.1:3;Tit.1:5.

c. The Body of Christ is not a vague, amorphous visualization or imagination, but a tangible reality represented by a local church.

Rev. Joseph EzeigboRev. Joseph Okechukwu Ezeigbo is a Bible teacher for the weekly Bible study at ECWA Maryland. He is also a part of the National Day of Prayer and the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted.



Bingham University Karu

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website
Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018
Download Bingham University Karu Information Bulletin

Quality, Moral Education
1. Introduction

Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria. Its founding fathers, visionaries within the various Executive Councils, as well academics of ECWA extraction, looked back to the golden age of mission education with its focus, purposefulness, and high quality. It was the desire for meeting the soaring need for not only quality, secular education, but education that recognizes and integrates the moral and spiritual values on which the Christian faith is founded which fueled its establishment. Recognizing the importance of the technological revolution of the 19th and 20th centuries, Bingham University is determined to build a technology-driven institution of the 21st century.

The University has had four (4) Vice Chancellors since inception. The Pioneer Vice Chancellor was Professor Aaron Gana of blessed memory from 2006 to 2007. He was succeeded by Professor Felix I. Anjorin also of blessed memory, from 2007 to 2013 . The third Vice Chancellor was Professor Leonard KursimFwa from 2013 to 2017, while the fourth Vice Chancellor is Professor William Barnabas Qurix, OFR 2018 onward.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-contentedness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose-driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).

Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’ (Mark 10:45). The motto emphasizes the type of knowledge and skills, which the university impact on its students. The ultimate goal is to produce graduates who would see themselves as a task force out to serve the society.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.

The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.

It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



Jeff Woodke’s wife releases third video plea for news of her husband

| Jeff Woodke had served in Niger for more than 29 years, providing food, water and other services to nomadic people. (Photo: You Tube)

The wife of an American missionary abducted 20 months ago in Africa’s Sahel region has put out a new video pleading for his safe return.

In the 4’10’’ footage released on Tuesday (26 June), in French, Els Woodke reiterated her despair and desire to be in touch with her husband’s kidnappers.

Jeff Woodke, who was working for Jeunesse en Mission Entraide et Développement, a branch of the US-based Youth With a Mission, was abducted by unknown assailants late in the evening of Friday 14 October, 2016, from the town of Abalak in northern Niger.

For 20 months, there has been no news of Woodke, but on 4 June, Niger’s president, Mahamadou Issoufou, told TV channel France24 that both Woodke and a German aid worker kidnapped in April this year are alive.

It was the first proof of life since their kidnapping.

Just a day before, on 3 June, at the end of the Muslim fasting period of Ramadan, a coalition of jihadist groups operating in Sahel, Jama’at Nasr al-Islam wal Muslimin (the ‘Group Supporting Islam and Muslims’), affiliated to Al-Qaeda, released a video showing footage of two women being held hostage in the Sahara: the French aid worker Sophie Pétronin, abducted in Mali’s northern town of Gao in December 2016, and the Colombian nun Gloria Argoti, kidnapped on 7 February 2017 from her convent in Karangasso, southern Mali.

In the video, Pétronin was allowed to listen to a telephone call from her son and to send a message back to him, while Sr. Argoti was also permitted to give a message.

“It was a humane and merciful act during Ramadan to allow these hostages to communicate with their families and friends,” said Els Woodke in her latest of three videos since her husband’s kidnapping. “But my husband Jeff has been held for a very long time and I have received no word from those who are holding him.”

She recalled that in July last year the kidnappers released a video showing six foreign hostages detained in the Sahara, but that her husband was not featured, nor mentioned, though the families were told to contact the kidnappers directly.

“So now I want to address myself to those who gave that instruction,” she said. “I want to talk to you. I am ready to negotiate the safe return of my husband. I only want Jeff to come home. If you are not able to negotiate yet, please allow Jeff to send his family a message, just as you have done with these other hostages.”

Jeff, in his 50s, had served in Niger for 29 years, providing food, water and other services to the Tamasheq, Fulani and other people groups.

In recognition of his commitment, he received the United Nations Sasakawa Award for Disaster Reduction in 2009, given to individuals or institutions that have advocated for the reduction of disaster risks in their communities, or taken active steps to prevent disasters.



Bingham University: Transform a person into Knowledge and skills driven, Christ centered Individual

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website | Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018

Quality, Moral Tertiary Education In Nigeria
1. Preamble
Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria.  As the name implies, the University was named after one of the trio of pioneer Sudan Interior Missionaries, Roland Victor Bingham whose vision along with those of other founding fathers desired to produce committed Christians in our institutions, including the University through which Christ-centred leaders would emerge.   The founding fathers intend to meet the soaring need for not only quality secular tertiary education but education that recognises and integrates moral and spiritual values in the face of degenerating social decadence in Nigerian University campuses.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-centeredness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose -driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).
Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.
The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.
It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



Mission: Update from Rev. Dr. & Mrs. Dennis and Coletta Shelly, with Special Prayer Request

by Rev. Dr. & Mrs. Dennis Shelly | Hello from Kagoro, where we’re beginning to see some rains falling again. Thanks for your prayers and support.

One big challenge we’ve faced this past week is with my (Dennis’) health. I’m having atrial fibrillation, with a very irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, and a low pulse. This began mid-last week, but caused my chest to be very tight during Sunday’s morning church service. Coletta then called our SIM mate here at Kagoro Seminary, Dr. Alexis Stokes. She came and conferred what Coletta had found. Monday morning we cancelled our classes and had our Seminary driver take us in our Rav4 to Abuja (about 4 hours away on some very bad roads) for testing at the Nizamiye (Turkish) Hospital to see one Turkish interventional cardiologist. I had blood work, an X-ray, one ECG and one Ecocardiogram done. He confirmed what Dr. Alexis and Coletta had seen. I’m now taking one anti-coagulant.

Our home mission, Fellowship International Mission (FIM), along with SIM in Jos and our home church, Calvary Church, Lancaster, PA, all fully support our plan to go home promptly to get more medical assistance. Here at the Seminary we still have one week of classes this week, and then a week of finals from May 9-16, before the semester ends on May 16. “Our” original plan was to stay at Kagoro for one month to oversee our final exams and correct them and our papers before coming to the US on June 11 for a one-month medical home assignment. Now “God’s” plan is leading us to go to the US over one month earlier.

So we’ve booked flights on Air France to fly from Abuja this coming Monday night, May 7 (at 11 pm Nigerian time, 5 pm EST), to Paris, then on to Atlanta, Georgia, before we end in Philadelphia, PA, on Tuesday evening, May 8 (at 6:44 pm EST, 11:44 pm Nigerian time). We’ll stay overnight with Coletta’s sister and brother-in-law, Dee and Mike Lindsey, in Philadelphia on Tuesday, before Dee will drive us to Lancaster on Wednesday, May 9. We already have an appointment for me to see a heart specialist next Friday, May 11.

Special Prayer Request
1. For us to be confident in God’s direction and comfort during these next days of travel to the US, changed schedules, and going through the process of seeing US doctors, etc., to get Dennis’ medical problems solved without any crises.
2. For good final days of classes this week and during final exams May 9-16.
3. God’s provision of more school fees for many students before final exams begin next week. Students can’t take exams unless their school fees are fully paid for.
4. For God’s continued protection over ETSK and various areas of Nigeria from clashes between Fulani cattle herdsmen and local villagers, as well as continued suicide bombings in northeastern Nigeria.
5. For God’s choice of another Ph.D. holder in Intercultural Studies (Missions) to join me as ETSK as we began a new M.A. in Missions program this past semester.
6. For God to enable Dwight and Amy to round up their ministries at Hillcrest School well and return to the US on June 8th. They still need a job for Dwight, housing, etc.
7. For Stephanie to be in good health and a good witness as she works at two Urgent Care Centers in Rohrerstown and Ephrata, PA.

Thanks for your part in the ministries here at ETSK, especially as you pray for us and our medical situation now. “God’s” plans and timing are definitely much different than “ours,” but “His” are “best.” We’ll have new lessons to learn as we move ahead and trust the Lord the next few weeks. We’ll keep in touch.

Rev. Dr. & Mrs. Dennis and Coletta Shelly

 

Rev. Dr. & Mrs. Dennis and Coletta Shelly serve as faculty at EWCA Theological Seminary in Ka-goro, Nigeria. Connect via dennisshelly@uuplus.net



ECWA New President: Rev. Dr. Stephen Panya Baba

by Friday Bako | The new ECWA President for the next 3three years is Rev. Stephen Panya Baba
The General Church Council of Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA), has as of Tuesday April 10, 2018 elected Rev. Stephen Panya Baba to lead the church for the next three years. He will take over from Rev Jeremiah Gado who served 2 consecutive terms of 3 years in the office.
Before his election, he was the EMS Cross Boarder Mission President, as well as ECWA Television Coordinator.

Rev. Baba polled 138 votes in the election that brought him in, beating Rev. Bitrus Sarma, who got 95 votes and Rev. Solomon Elisha who got 21 votes.

He will be sworn-in in June, alongside other elected leaders; the Assistant General Secretary, Rev Alex Ibi; and the Treasurer, Dr. Kalu Mc. Umeh, who has been re-elected into office for another 3-year term.

Stephen is the son of the former ECWA President, Rev. Dr. Panya Dabo Baba who served as President from 1988.



Standing for Christ

by Hanne Herland | Jesus showed a remarkable empathy and kindness for the weak, the poor and the sick. We should follow his example in our everyday lives. (image, YouTube)

We live in an age where many question Christianity. It somehow has become fashionable to be an atheist. The mainstream media constantly focus on negative news about Christians. Believers in God are told that they are old-fashioned, outdated and simply out of touch with reality. And many young people struggle, as they don’t quite know how to approach this fervent disdain.

This is why it is more important than ever to educate yourself on how to defend the faith, how to rationally and spiritually explain the Christian belief to those who, out of ignorance, think that belief in God belongs to the past. Read The Culture War: How the West Lost its Greatness and get the tools. Remember that atheism is a faith like any other, the belief in “nothing” and the assortment that “the universe is empty.” None of them ever went out there to check, so how do they know there is no God, angels or devils out there? They assume based on faith. Atheism is a religion, they strongly believe that “God is dead” and mankind is the only source of light, which is impossible to prove empirically.

The question becomes who really is out of touch with reality, as several of the most important values in our culture come from Christianity and its ethics. Professor at Yale and Harvard, historian Robert R. Palmer has pointed out that it is simply impossible to exaggerate the importance of Christianity’s influence on the development of Western values. The whole foundation of our Western civilization lay precisely on the very values that stem from Christianity. Let me name a couple.

It was the profoundly Christian thought that introduced the principle of equality in the West, the revolutionary idea that each man, regardless of class, gender and race, has a unique value. The leading French atheist, Michel Houellebecq proclaims that he is convinced we would never have human rights without the originally Jewish-Christian hypothesis, the incredibly bold idea that man is created, formed in the likeness of God and therefore also sanctified. The ideal of equality would later in history be seen as a secular idea, and one of the cornerstones of secular society, yet there is no doubt about its religious origins.

As believers, the example of Jesus stands high above any other. As we examine his life, we see, for example, how he completely revolutionized the view on women. He freely engaged with them in a way that broke with the traditions at the time. The story of the Samaritan woman at the well serves as an example. Remember, as a Samaritan, she was a complete outsider to the Jewish community. Jews did not mingle much with them, and they were considered a disrespected sect due to the way they worshipped, which differed somehow from the Jewish traditions.

On many occasions, the revolutionary Jesus broke off from the socially acceptable and freely engaged in apologetic debates with all kinds of “outsiders.” His disciples were quite shocked to see him speak to the Samaritan woman, engaging in discussion, showing her profound love that made her a believer. She felt honored to have met a prophet and went and told everyone. Jesus was arguably “the first feminist”; he deeply respected women. He was often criticized by the religious communities for allowing a “bad woman” to wash his feet, stopped the throwing of stones and told the woman at the well to “Go and sin no more” (John 8:11b). He had the habit of saving people’s lives. By his example, he opened up profound freedoms that to this day permeate the Western culture.

Jesus showed a remarkable empathy and kindness for the weak, the poor and the sick. We should follow his example in our everyday lives. This was also a highly unusual approach, not distinguishing between rich and poor. He was born in a stable in opposition to the arrogant and selfishly rich and affluent, again a dramatic statement of the value of human life—regardless of class, social standing or ethnicity. The early Christians worked to relieve suffering, help the poor and so on. They taught humility and that all men were brothers. As we see, the Christian contribution brought revolutionary elements to Western values and taught that in the eyes of God all men are equal. What a wonderful Christian ideal this is in our culture.

Hanne Nabintu Herland, historian of religions and author of The Culture War. How the West Lost Its Greatness. Visit theherlandreport.com for more information.



Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

by Joshua and Joanna Bogunjoko, SIM International Director | In joyful obedience, SIM workers continue to respond to Jesus’ invitation to “Come, follow me!”
For unto us a Child is born,
Unto us a Son is given;
And the government will be upon His shoulder.
And His name will be called
Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” Isaiah 9:6.

Come!
Entering the season of Christmas, I am reminded of the words of the hymn, “O come, let us adore Him” and “Come, and behold Him!”, referring to the newborn King. Jesus would later speak the word come when he said, “Come, follow me.”

The invitation to Come!, available to us every day, is all the more poignant during the season of Christmas. Shepherds and foreign magi came to worship the incarnated Christ Child upon his arrival into human history. Through the ages, believers from numerous ethnic groups and nations have continued coming to worship and adore.

But this invitation is not heard by everyone on earth. Many are living and dying today behind barriers to the gospel that silence and block the come! And so we go to the ends of the earth so that many more may come to worship Him.

In 2018, SIM will celebrate its 125th anniversary. Our purpose and vision remains constant. Even as I write, many living in darkness are responding to the Christmas invitation to “Come, adore Him!” In joyful obedience, SIM workers continue to respond to Jesus’ invitation to “Come, follow me!”.

Thank you for your prayers, gifts, support, friendship and service with, and alongside of, us, our family and SIM. Come, let us adore Him together!

Purpose & Mission

Convinced that no one should live and die without hearing God’s good news, we believe that He has called us to make disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ in communities where He is least known.

Therefore, compelled by God’s great love and empowered by the Holy Spirit…

  • We cross barriers to proclaim the crucified and risen Christ, expressing His love and compassion among those who live and die without Him
  • We make disciples who will trust and obey Jesus, and become part of Christ-centered churches
  • We work together with churches to fulfill God’s mission across cultures locally and globally
  • We facilitate the participation in cross-cultural ministry of those whom God is calling.

Vision

The vision of SIM is to see a witness to Christ’s love where He is least known, disciples of Jesus expressing God’s love in their communities, and Christ-centred churches among all peoples.

By faith we see…
in the world: A vibrant testimony to the gospel through character, word and action among communities where currently Jesus is least known. Followers of Jesus living out the gospel in unity and in the power of the Holy Spirit, making disciples who trust Him, obey him, and play a full part in church life. Churches serving their communities and reaching out with the gospel locally and globally.

in SIM: A community growing in faith, in obedience to Jesus, and in ministry competence. Workers crossing barriers with the gospel, being and making disciples of Jesus, expressing His love and compassion. Multi-ethnic and multi-skilled teams serving together in love and harmony. Courageous leaders investing in the development of others for life transforming ministries. Effective partnerships with Christ-centered churches and organizations facilitating the spread of the Gospel.

in eternity: The redeemed from all tribes, languages, peoples and nations worshiping the Living God.

 



ECWA USA History

by Sunday & Grace Bwanhot | ECWA formerly launched its foreign missions during the centennial celebrations in December 1993 when its own ‘three pioneer couples’:  Simon & Ruth Yako, Joshua and Joanna Bogunjoko, and Sunday & Grace Bwanhot were commissioned at the Jos township stadium.

ECWA grew out of SIM’s ministry (formally Sudan Interior Mission; Now: Serving In Missions). It began its work in Nigeria in December 1893 through the pioneering efforts of Rowland Bingham, Thomas Kent and Walter Gowans. The Church planted then was called SIM church but it was handed over to nationals in 1954. ECWA was registered in Nigeria as Evangelical Churches of West Africa on June 11, 1956. Later the name was amended to be: Evangelical Church of West Africa and now: Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA).

With the exception of some EMS (Evangelical Missionary Society) missionaries working in some countries in West Africa and the few churches in the USA and Britain, ECWA has largely remained a Nigerian church. It is to be noted that EMS of ECWA is the single largest indigenous mission agency in Africa. Although ECWA, through its mission agency, EMS, has a foreign mission policy, the policy continues to remain in the back burner of ECWA.

Officially, ECWA formerly launched its foreign missions during the centennial celebrations in December 1993 when its own ‘three pioneer couples’:  Simon & Ruth Yako, Joshua and Joanna Bogunjoko, and Sunday & Grace Bwanhot were commissioned at the Jos township stadium. The Yakos proceeded to Togo (Now in Nigeria), the Bogunjoko’s to Niger (Now in USA) and the Bwanhots in the USA. God made the move in spite of ECWA’s non committal to global evangelization. While God was using Rev. James Gabis to initiate ECWA’s ministries in the UK, God worked also through individuals here in the US to establish the ministry. Currently Israel and Gambia are the latest mission fields where ECWA is engaged in church planting.

ECWA Church New York

Late Elder Francis (left) and Grace Dada (Right), ECWA NY

Late Elder Francis (left) & Grace Dada (Right), ECWA NY, 1987

This is the first ECWA Church to be planted in the US in 1987 through the inspiring work of Elder Francis Dada’s father in-law. The church uses a rented facility located at 966 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY. Attendance at its peak averaged 60 to 75 people. The biggest challenge of this church has been a lack of a resident pastor. They have had several people fill in for brief periods of time. There was a conflict that led to several leaving the church and till today the church is yet to recover from that. Attendance currently is about 10 people.

 

ECWA Church Maryland

ECWA Church MD

ECWA Church MD, 1997

This is the second ECWA church planted in the US in January 1997 and it is currently the largest of all our churches with attendance in the neighborhood of 75 or more. The church bought a property that is being used for worship services and is located at: 5526 Marlboro Pike, District Heights, MD 20747. Rev. George Adekeye has been the pastor of the church since its inception.

 

ECWA Church Chicago

ECWA Church Chicago, At Handover, Jan 7, 2007

ECWA Church Chicago, At Handover, 2007

This is the third ECWA church planted in the USA on June 1, 1997. The church has been meeting in the lower level of Uptown Baptist Church at 1011 W. Wilson Avenue, Chicago, IL 60640. Attendance is between 40 and 50 and members come from several different countries. On January 7, 2007 Rev. Dr. Isaac Laudarji took over as the pastor from Rev. Sunday Bwanhot who started the church and pastored it till then.

 

First & Second ECWA Church Louisville

First & Second ECWA Church, Louisville, KY, 2001

First & Second ECWA Church, Louisville, KY, 2001

This is the fourth church planted in the US and is being pastored by Rev. Dr. Stephen Awoniyi. The church was officially inaugurated April 15, 2001. The church worships at 5007 Southside Dr. Louisville, KY 40214. Although attendance has declined from the average of 40 in the main church, the blessing of having the 2nd ECWA Church – Swahili speaking congregation under the leadership of Rev. Jean Nzeyimana is highly appreciated.

 

ECWA Church, Atlanta

ECWA Church, Atlanta, GA, 2007

ECWA Church, Atlanta, GA, 2007

This is the fifth ECWA Church in the USA. It was officially inaugurated on Sunday September 2, 2007 under the leadership of Rev. Innocent Nwaobasi. The church currently meets at the home of Elder Josiah Osasona. Attendance is still low – under 20. Property was purchased early this year and Lord willing the church will move to its permanent site in due course.

 

 

Prayer Houses

ECWA Prayer Cell, Columbia, SC, 2006

ECWA Prayer Cell, Columbia, SC, 2006

While several Prayer houses have been started across the country, there is a general struggle to keep these prayer houses going:

  • Prayer House, Columbia SC, 2006
  • Prayer House in Los Angeles CA,
  • Prayer House in Dallas/Fort Wayne TX
  • Prayer House in Houston, TX, 2012
  • Prayer House, Xenia, OH, 2012
  • Prayer House in Minneapolis/St. Paul’s area, MN.

We need to pray for these Prayer Houses to stand.

 

How We Got Organized

Steering committee members that helped in mobilizing ECWA in the US.

Steering committee members that helped in mobilizing ECWA in the US, 1999

The first two churches planted came about because of the efforts of some ECWA individuals who felt the Lord leading them to do that. There was no organization, no plan or strategy for church planting for ECWA here in the US. The two churches existed independently of each other and of ECWA Headquarters.

Rev. Panya Baba (former ECWA President) visited the US and he and Rev. Bwanhot had a discussion. The outcome of which was a February 15, 1997 meeting in MD with the following in attendance: Rev. Panya Baba, Rev. George Adekeye, Mr. Sunday Buge, Rev. Innocent Nwaobasi, Elder Henry Bello, Dr. James Angbazo, Rev. Joseph Obielodan and Rev. Sunday Bwanhot. Our agenda was to consider our role as ECWA members in the spiritual well-being of our people and others in the US. A Sub-Committee was appointed to plan a big ECWA Family Reunion for July 2-5, 1999.



ECWA History

ECWA is the result of several missionaries that traveled to Africa from Canada and the United States in the late 1800’s. ECWA is currently the largest Protestant denomination in Nigeria with over 6,000 churches having an adult membership of 2.5 million and nearly 5 million in total attendance.

The Evangelical Church of West Africa was renamed “Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA)” because of its wide spread to beyond its scope. It was a result of ministry history and the wide spread of the gospel of Jesus Christ in Africa by several missionaries who came from several places in the Canada and the United States of American on what can be termed “evangelical suicide mission” which was coined by Oji Chukwudimma Chukwudike because it will be glaring to see that West Africa, at that time, was known to be heavily infested with malaria and there is almost a 100% possibility that a white man will not survive it as they even called the West African region “the white man’s grave.” These missionaries braved malaria and yellow fever to preach the gospel of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ under the auspices of the Sudan Interior Mission (SIM) and planted several churches as they preach along like Paul the Apostle and around mid 20th century these churches became independent to carry on the gospel. ECWA has the largest mission organization of any African church living up to its name Evangelical which by name Evangelical Mission Society (ESM) has sent out over 1,400 missionaries.

Throughout Nigeria, but especially in the central regions, ECWA churches are growing rapidly. Some churches have experienced as much as 400% growth in the last several years. Churches in the Northern (traditionally more Islamic) parts of the country are also growing. There are currently more than five thousand ECWA congregations with more than five million attendees and a church membership of over three million people. ECWA has over eighty District Church Councils called DCC’s and a number of Local Church Councils called LCC’s.

ECWA has three Theological Seminaries: ECWA Theological Seminary, Kagoro was established in 1931, ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja in 1941, and Jos ECWA Theological Seminary in 1980. There are also eight Bible colleges and fifteen theological training institutes. ECWA’s Medical Department coordinates a wide network which includes four hospitals, a Community Health Program with over 110 health clinics, a Central Pharmacy and the School of Nursing and Midwifery. It is also involved in radio, publications for outreach and discipleship, rural development, urban ministries, and cross-cultural missions. There are more than 1,600 missionaries from ECWA churches who serve in Nigeria and other countries with the Evangelical Missionary Society (EMS), the missionary arm of ECWA.

There has been a serious confrontation between evangelical Christians standing in opposition to the expansion of Sharia law in northern Nigeria by militant Muslims since 1999. The confrontation has radicalized and politicized the Christians. Violence has been escalating.



British Missionary Kidnapped in Nigeria has been Killed

by Veronica Neffinger | Squires was one of four British missionaries who were abducted by the Nigerian cult in the country. He was working to help provide eye care for people in the country.(image, McKinsey & Company)

A British missionary who was abducted in October by a Nigerian cult has reportedly been killed.

According to Open Doors USA, Ian Squires was shot after leading a group in singing “Amazing Grace.”

“This missionary, Ian Squire, he was a real person,” said David Curry, of Open Doors USA. “He’s a real human being who was giving his life to try to help these folks in the south of Nigeria, and he was kidnapped and killed for his faith.

“And there are many people like him in Nigeria who have names and faces and families. They’re not all British, most of them are Nigerian themselves but they love Jesus and they’re dying for their faith.”

Squires was one of four British missionaries who were abducted by the Nigerian cult in the country. He was working to help provide eye care for people in the country.

“It’s just another example of what’s happening in Nigeria, although in a different vein,” Curry said. “Nigeria is a country that’s divided into—you’ve got the southern portion that’s largely Christian, but you have tribal factions in the north. You have these extremists from Boko Haram. It’s a country that is being pulled in a lot of directions.”

In November, a child suicide bombing killed more than 50 people in a mosque attack and another conflict between herders and farmers killed at least 30 people.

Nigeria is ranked number 12 on the Open Doors World Watch List of countries where Christians face the worst persecution.

“We are a particular people called by the name of Jesus,” Curry said. “We are called in Scripture to care for, to pray for others who are in chains or persecuted for the name of Jesus, and we have not done it. We do it on an incidental basis if we hear about an episode.

“This needs to be integrated into every church, every small group, every person’s prayer life that you’re praying for what God is doing in Africa, in Nigeria, those imprisoned and hurt and attacked, because we’re family.”

 



Need Support for the Miango Community and Surrounding Villages Invaded by the Fulani Herdsmen Militias

by Rev. Stephen Baba Panya | The Fulani Jihadists herdsmen are in the very minority who move around tending their  cattle . However, they are so well armed and move about causing serious havoc in terms of destruction of lives and properties that, they have been officially listed as the fourth most dangerous terrorist  group in the world today.

Download Situational Report of the Miango Community and Surrounding Villages Invasion by the Fulani Herdsmen Militias

Financial help needed in burring the dead and rebuilding the Miango Community and Surrounding Villages.

Many of us are already aware of the incessant attacks of Miango communities by Fulani Jihadist herdsmen Militia. Above you will find the link to a report by our Crisis Relief Desk from eye witnesses of the evil carnage that took place . Our sources are very authentic. However, be warned that the attached report and images displayed below on the Miango genocide by Fulani Jihadist Herdsmen malitia  against the Miango Christian Community contains very graphic images that some may not be able to watch.

Miango is basically a Christian populated land with majority  of them belonging to the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA)  church, a consequence  of the former Sudan Interior Missions (SIM) mission work in the area.

The Fulani Jihadists herdsmen are in the very minority who move around tending their  cattle . However, they are so well armed and move about causing serious havoc in terms of destruction of lives and properties that, they have been officially listed as the fourth most dangerous terrorist  group in the world today. Despite this, they have the tacit and sometimes open support of the Moslem dominated Federal Government because of the Islamic conspiracy against Christians in Nigeria.

It has become a common  pattern that while the Fulani Jihadists  consistently kill and maim whole peoples and communities, none has ever been arrested, talk more of being persecuted, because they have the support of Muslim dominated Federal government and security outfits which are all headed by Muslims. On the other hand, soon after the Fulani Jihadists have done their worst with the security men staying aloof and sometimes under their cover like it happened  recently in the Miango carnage, the security men usually rush in and then arrest community members trying to use  local weapons like matches, cutlasses and den guns for self defence and then, they  parade them on the media as the trouble makers and aggressors. This has been the consistent pattern of operation of security men when it comes to Muslim / Christian conflicts or more appropriately, the systematic genocide of Christians by these Fulani Jihadist herdsmen militia..

Christian communities, especially in the predominant Christian Middlebelt areas of Nigeria, are left defenceless by the Federal Government, and  are in fact deliberately and very wickedly stripped of any self defence  and left at the mercy of Fulani Jihadist herdsmen,  who are well armed with the most  sophisticated weapons which they are using to carry  out a systamic genocide against Christians.

Our Prayers:

  1. We need Brethren all over the world to join us in pleading with God for mercy and deliverance from the oppression of Fulani Jihadist herdsmen militia  and the Muslim Fulani dominated Federal Government of Nigeria who are supporting them. President Buhari himself is a Fulani Muslim and while he has hypocritically condemned terrorist acts abroad and the persecution of Rohinja Muslims in Myammar, he  has refused to condemn this evil terrorist  carnage by his kinsmen back at home in Nigeria.
  2. Pray that God will specially comfort the traumatised survivors of the evil carnage. The harrowing experience that the survivors went through and the pain of loosing whole family members are just to unimaginable.
  3. Much as it is very difficult to do this right now when we are all in severe pains for loss of loved ones, lets pray that God would give us the grace to pray for the salvation of these Jihadists, that they would encounter Christ and bow and submit to His Lordship.
  4. We need Brethren all over the world to send help in cash and kind, so that we can give emergency relief to the affected Miango communities. Many are internally displaced and have no food, water, clothing and other basic needs. The need is great and desperate. Relief materials scan be sent to EMS of ECWA’s Head Office, ECWA Headquarters, No. 1 Noad Avenue, Jos, Nigeria.

EMS  Crisis Relief Desk is already reaching out to the affected victims. We need  much more help. Cash support can be paid into any of the following accounts and please text or email (crossborders@emsofecwa.org) us to let us know so that we can use the funds for that purpose.

BANK ACCOUNT NAME: EMS OF ECWA
Zennith Bank 6013304985   (Dollars Only)
Zennith Bank 4080996015  (Euro Only)
Diamond Bank 0011572922
First Bank 2001336577
Access  Bank 0400023912
Union Bank 0019424344

I oversee the EMS Crisis Relief desk and you can reach me by phone at : +(234) 8135910361 (Overseas) / 08135910361 (Nigerians). May the Lord bless you as you respond to help His people in desperate need in Jesus name. Amen

SITUATIONAL REPORT OF THE MIANGO COMMUNITY AND SURROUNDING VILLAGES INVASSION BY THE FULANI HERDSMEN MILITIAS

It is about one month now since the Miango community began to experience a series of attacks that have led to the loss of many lives and properties.  These attacks have been carried out by Fulani Jihadists Herdsmen Militias under the guise of being a reprisal for a single Fulani man who was attacked and killed as a result of a false alarm raised.

Immediately after that killing, community leaders swiftly apologized for the mistake to the leadership of the Fulani and also promised to fish out the perpetrators of the crime.  Subsequently some arrests were indeed made.  However, the Fulani leadership refused to understand with the situation and took advantage of this mistake to advance their Jihad by killing many people and destroying properties in several villages in the past 4 weeks.

The attack in Ta’agbe community which took place on the 15th of October, 2017 at midnight is the 5th attack in four weeks.  This attack was carried out by Fulanis Jihadists who where neighbors with the victims.  The attackers succeeded in killing 6 people (2 children, 1 elderly man and 3 women); 3 women and 2 children also sustained bullet wounds. These 5 persons are currently in the hospital and are receiving treatment.  Prior to this current attack, the community recorded four different attacks in Ncha, Kpara, Nkiendonworo and Rikwe Chongu.  In these attacks about 25 lives were lost and properties destroyed including 19 houses in total with every valuable inside.

Mr. Joshua whose family was directly affected reports that the attackers came in at 12 midnight through the way they use to go to the stream to fetch water.  Meanwhile they were in the mountains keeping vigilant.  He saw 8 persons in total, while 4 people went into the house with explosives and set fire.    The 4 outside were keeping watch and shooting continuously in the air to scare people from coming close.  Joshua had no capacity to go and rescue his family members.  He could only think of running away.  For about 30 minutes the attackers were there shooting and setting everything in sight on fire.  The granary was also set on fire with all the food stored in it.  Every single room was set on fire, while 3 persons were shot and hacked with machetes.  Out of the 6 people killed, 3 where completely burnt beyond recognition, 1 sustained serious burns only 2 not burnt.

Currently thousands of people have been displaced, mostly women and child even from other isolated villages out of fear of being attacked.  The displaced persons are currently being accommodated in the homes of relatives and other neighboring houses.  Some have travelled as far as Jos while those who have no place to go remain in their villages and hundreds are camped at the ECWA Bishara 1 in Miango.  A better arrangement will be made in days to come to properly camp them in the primary school in Chinye, Miango town.  The status of these IDPs is barely known adequately.  The community members are trying to respond to their needs in the area of food and water supply.  However, the need is great and many families are already housing a lot of people beyond their capacity.   As for those who are camped in the church to be transferred to the primary school subsequently, it is not known how their needs can be met.

As long as the community remains unsafe, it means that they will not be able to harvest their farm produce.  This is harvest time and if this is not done this means there will be hunger in the land soon.  Children are not in school and if schools will be occupied by the displaced persons in Miango town, children within Miango cannot attend school as well.

The immediate need of the situation currently includes the following:

  • The need for a habitable environment for accommodation for the IDPs
  • There is need for food supply to feed them.
  • There is high need for water supply.
  • The suggested environment to keep them now needs good toilet facilities.
  • The need for medical services to care for those who may be sick.
  • The need for buckets, blankets and utensils and clothes.
  • Security in the camp for proper checks.

When the security situation has improved resettlement of the displaced citizens will begin.  This is to ensure a quick return to their homes to begin harvest of their farm produce.

Five people currently in the hospital, 3 women and 2 boys - 1st Patient Five people currently in the hospital, 3 women and 2 boys - 2nd Patient
Five people currently in the hospital, 3 women and 2 boys - 3rd Patient Five people currently in the hospital, 3 women and 2 boys - Page 4

Five people currently in the hospital, 3 women and 2 boys

Six dead bodies, one child, two men and three women - 4th image
Six dead bodies, one child, two men and three women - 3rd image Six dead bodies, one child, two men and three women - 2nd image

Six dead bodies, one child, two men and three women - 1st image

Six dead bodies, one child, two men and three women

Selected images of burnt houses - 1st image Selected images of burnt houses - 2nd image
Selected images of burnt houses - 3rd image Selected images of burnt houses - 4th image

Sample pictures of houses burnt

Update at the point of completing this report. , On the night of 25th October, 2017 at Nkiedonwhro village, a fresh attack which left 27 people dead in a primary school class room where the military deceptively lured innocent villagers under a pretense of safety in a primary school.    The military who were stationed in that primary school later abandoned it and allowed the Fulani Jihadists to attack.  The Fulani attacked and killed 27 people.   Only 1 woman escaped into the bush and watched with dismay how the Fulanis attacked and killed every one inside as the Military lied quietly in the bushes without responding to the attacking Fulanis.   The people had been in the process of moving to safety in a nearby village when the military made it’s bogus offer of safety at the primary school.   Unknown to them that promise of safety was actually a trick and became the end of their lives here on Earth.

Details of the series of attacks

  1. Hukke community 9th September, 2017, 2 persons killed including a soldier and one soldier sustain bullet wounds who later died
  2. Nkiedonhwro community 8th October, 2017 1 killed and another wounded
  3. Kpachudu 10t October – A young man, Solomon Elisha killedallegedly by a Mobile Policeman, member of STF
  4. Nzhweruvo and Tafigana – 11th October 3 dead and Houses razed down
  5. Rikwe Chongu – 12th October, Houses razed down
  6. Ta’egbe – 14th October, 6 dead, 5 injured and houses razed
  7. Nkiendonhwro 16th October, 29 dead, 3 injured at a school used as a Camp and protected by security.
  8. About 31 houses so far razed
  9. Approximately 1000 families displaced from the villages affected and other villages who fear attack.

We pray for a good support from concerned individuals, organizations and governments to restore life back to normalcy in the affected communities and Miango as well.  There is need to rebuild confidence and trust in displaced persons and to ensure security for them to return home.  Meanwhile their immediate need is still a huge challenge that we need people to respond to immediately.

Need help rebuilding Miango and the affected communities - 3rd images
Need help rebuilding Miango and the affected communities

Need help rebuilding Miango and the affected communities - 2nd images

Need help rebuilding Miango and the affected communities.

Joshua’s Story

I will never forget the moment when the sweet still silence of that cool October night was suddenly shattered by rapid-fire gunshots.  It was midnight, 15th October 2017.

Our little village of Ta’agbe is surrounded by hills so it seemed a good idea for the men of the village to keep a vigilant watch from the hills and allow others to get some rest.    No one had rested very well for several nights since the attacks by Fulani Jihadists had begun on villagers in the Miango area.

I counted eight men.  Four with guns stayed outside shooting their guns in the air to cause commotion and raise the level of fear, dissuading people from running out of the houses.   A chill raced through me as I asked myself the question, “Where did simple herdsmen get access to such sophisticated weaponry?”   The other four entered the houses with explosives and began setting the houses on fire.   They set on fire everything in sight, even our granaries.

Another chill swept through my body; I recognized some of these men; they had been our neighbors!

In an instant a host of different emotions flooded through me.   I felt like a coward for not rushing down the mountainside to rescue my family; yet what could I do – these men had sophisticated weapons.   I would be dead before I could even reach my people.   I also felt helpless.   Completely helpless in the face of such weaponry.   For a fact, there was nothing I could do to save my family.    At the same time I felt strangely lucky to be in this place of safety.    Did God have me here for a reason?

Within just a few minutes the attackers were gone.    In less then 30 minutes it was all over, the fires were already dying down.   We climbed down the mountainside to find 3 bodies burned beyond recognition, 3 people shot and hacked by machete.    The dead included 2 children, 1 elderly man and 3 women.

Perhaps God spared me just so I could tell you this story.

Asabe John Story

I hadn’t slept for days, ever since the attacks by Fulani Jihadist Militias had started on our villages near Miango.   No one had slept much these last few nights.    Now I was lying on the floor in a primary school classroom.   I was about to doze off when I suddenly realized that it become very quiet.   Too quiet.    The noise of the soldiers who had been patrolling around the classroom where we were all gathered had ceased.    What was happening?    Surely all the soldiers would not just suddenly stand still at the same moment.    I got up and looked out the window near to where I had been lying.  I thought I saw soldiers disappearing into the bush.   Why would the soldiers be leaving?   They were the ones helping us.

Earlier that day many of us from my village had been making our way through the bush headed for another village where we thought we would be safer.   On our way we met with soldiers who told us of a security post they had recently established at a nearby primary school.    They persuaded us to follow them there.   We were all in one classroom, feeling very safe with soldiers all around us.   That is until everything got quiet, and I looked out the window and saw the soldiers disappearing into the bush.

Then it happened.  From the other side of the classroom the door burst open and Fulani Jihadists burst in with automatic weapons.   I was already hanging out the window, so I just dropped to the ground outside.  Bratatat, Bratatat, Bratatat, Bratatat, Bratatat, Bratatat.  I could hear the sound of the guns firing but I didn’t look back.    I just ran.

From my hiding place in the bush, I heard the voices of people I knew shouting amidst the sound of the gunfire.   Suddenly all was quiet.  Then I heard the distinctive rhythm of Fulfulde as voices inside the classroom shouting orders and questions.    The sound of people running away. Then all was quiet again.

Twenty seven of my family and dearest friends lay still in the classroom; their spirits departed to a better place.

And there I was crouching in the bush.  The soldiers hadn’t seen me.    But I saw them, hiding in the bush too.

Rev. Stephen Panya Baba is the former Director of Evangelical Missionary Society (EMS).



Rev. Dr. Panya Dabo Baba: A Man Apart

by Dr. Musa A. B. Gaiya | Panya personally founded the Nigeria Evangelical Mission Association (NEMA) that brought together all evangelical mission bodies (image courtesy of SIM/ECWA)

Rev. Dr. Panya Dabo Baba, a resident of the Overseas Ministry Study Center from 1996 to 1997, has been described as the greatest missiologist of the ECWA (formerly Evangelical Church of West Africa founded by the Sudan Interior Mission but now Evangelical Church Winning All). His tenure as director of the Evangelical Missionary Society (EMS) was outstanding and he raised the mission to an international level. The growth of the ECWA in Nigeria and abroad was mostly due to his ingenious mission strategy.

Panya was born in Karu on January 20, 1932 to Baba and Gnubwanyi, both of them Gbayi of Nasarawa State on Nigeria. Panya's parents were Christians, so he grew up in a Christian family. Baba was the chief of the Karu or the Estu Karu. At his birth Panya was named Panyadabo, which means "remember God the owner"–advice to Panya to remember God who made him. Panya did. When Panya sustained an injury that broke his skull as a toddler, his parents thought he would never survive. He survived but still carries a visible scar–a recovery which Panya considers miraculous. Later in his life, God also healed him of a very serious stomach ailment that almost killed him when he was working as a missionary.

Past and Current Involvement in Church Ministry

He began his early education by enrolling in the Karu SIM Primary School where he studied from 1942 to 1945. Panya heard the gospel from SIM missionary Mrs. H. W. Caster but did not understand it initially. In 1945, though, Panya clearly heard the gospel and received Christ as his personal Savior through Malam Sabuda, a student at the Karu Bible School who hailed from Kaltungo, in northeastern Nigeria. As Panya testified, "Kneeling to God in my small room, I told Him I was sorry for my sins and asked for His forgiveness. I told God I wanted to be one of His children. The moment I finished that prayer, I felt different…that was the day and time Jesus came into my life." Panya was baptized in 1946.

Having heard the call of God to go into full time Christian service, Panya studied at the Karu Vernacular Bible Training School from 1946 to 1947. In 1949 he accepted the challenge to become a missionary among his people, the Gbagyi, in Sarkin Pawa (Niger Province) in northern Nigeria to teach them the Bible. His desire to do mission work continued to grow. He returned to Karu in 1951 and was admitted to Karu Bible Training School for additional training in 1952. In 1954 he was called by the ECWA church in Karu to be a pastor starting in 1957 and was licensed and ordained in 1960. In 1961 Panya went to Kagoro Bible College where he earned a certificate in Bible. He returned to Karu in 1963 to continue as pastor of the Evangelical Church of West Africa (ECWA) church there. But Panya's heart was more in missions. While Panya was pastoring this church he was appointed director of the Evangelical Missionary Society, where he made his most significant contribution to the course of evangelization of Africa.

Panya married Tayado Dokwadayi in February of 1951. Tayado means "Never depart"–perhaps a prayer that she not die. They had six children–three girls and three boys. They adopted an orphan boy named Ishaya at the age of six. Tayado died in childbirth on April 23, 1963.

Afterwards Panya married Ruth Lami Ataku on February 22, 1964. She gave birth to seven children, two of whom died. All together Panya had fourteen children including one adopted son. One of his sons, Luka, is now (2006) the Estu Karu or paramount chief of Karu.

Panya's growing interest in missions led him to apply to All Nations Christian College in England where he was accepted and studied from 1969 to 1970. When he returned to Nigeria he was the best person to take charge of the Evangelical Missionary Society (EMS)–at that time the only indigenous mission organization in Nigeria. His training at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, U.S.A. further enriched his understanding of missions and evangelism. He brought his knowledge, experience, leadership abilities, and zeal to EMS. He encouraged young graduates from Bible colleges and seminaries to join the mission, and as a result the number of missionaries increased from 194 in 1970 when he took over to 750 in 1988 when he left office as director.

He also believed in sending missionaries abroad as he felt Nigeria had come to that stage. As a result, EMS missionaries were sent out from two West African countries to five other countries including the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Panya believed in the interdependence between the developed world and the underdeveloped world in mission. He believed the developed West had a lot to give Africa in terms of finances, specialized personnel, and technical assistance, and Africa had a lot to give the West in terms of evangelism and mission. That is why when he stepped down as ECWA president in 1994 and he started the Foreign Mission of EMS.

Panya personally founded the Nigeria Evangelical Mission Association (NEMA) that brought together all evangelical mission bodies. Out of NEMA the Nigeria Evangelical Missionary Institute was created to train young men and women for cross-cultural mission work and the NEMA Searchlight Project designed to research unreached peoples groups. Through the Searchlight Project Panya discovered a number of ethnic groups in Nigeria that had not heard the gospel. These were the Koma, the Boko, the Dakawa, the Kambari, the Undir, the Dirim, and the Bolewa.

Panya was not only a missionary administrator and a strategist; he was also a missionary advocate. Everywhere he went he spoke on missions. At all the international conferences he attended any papers he gave were on the topic of mission. Panya was a member of several international missionary organizations and associations. Ruth Cox, his secretary while he was director of EMS, said of him, "He is always looking for ways to spread the gospel, looking for areas where it has not been preached. He doesn't know the difference between work and pleasure…to him they are the same. He has put missions and the gospel first…this is his life."

When Panya was elected president of the ECWA in 1988 it meant he would have to leave EMS, the place he loved so much. He served as president of ECWA for six years but although he did his work well he did not love it as much as being a missions' administrator. Also, it was very difficult to find someone to fill the vacuum created after Panya left EMS.

As a result of Panya's immense service in the ECWA, especially as EMS director, the governing council and faculty of the ECWA Seminary, Igbaja, awarded him a doctorate of divinity honoraris causa on May 18, 1991. In addition, the West African Theological Seminary gave Panya the Akanu Ibiam Award "for excellence in cross-cultural mission".

Panya Baba retired from active service in the ECWA in 1998. He returned home to Karu and has been preoccupied with writing his thoughts about mission, giving lectures at mission conferences, preaching, offering counseling and helping in any way he can in the local ECWA church in Karu.

 



Senegal Mission Initiative

Global Ministries began its work in Senegal in 1989, deploying missionaries to help start social programs in a mission in this small francophone country on the west coast of Africa (Global Ministries & the Senegal United Methodist Mission)

The strong lay and clergy leadership lead the Senegal church closer to self-sufficiency each year. They plan to be established as a United Methodist provisional annual conference or a district of an existing annual conference by 2020.

There are 19 churches and six faith communities in Senegal, with eight ordained pastors and 12 lay pastors. The congrega­tions in Senegal are vibrant and the government partners with some of the work of the mission. Leaders from Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, the General Board of Global Ministries, and mission partners train pastors, educate children, raise funds to purchase land for the new mission center, and purchase land for church construction. In addition, an agricultural missionary is working with the communities around the churches to develop gardens and provide training. A young adult intern and a National in Mission support these efforts.

Global Ministries began its work in Senegal in 1989, deploying missionaries to help start social programs in a mission in this small francophone country on the west coast of Africa. Bishop Benjamin Boni of the Côte d’Ivoire Episcopal Area provides episcopal oversight for the mission.

Challenges

The United Methodist Church is one of the minority denominations and remains largely unknown in Senegal. It collaborates with Muslim leaders, who represent 80 percent of the population. Some programs are familiar because the mission was initially set up as a nongovernmental organization. Growth has been slow and poverty within the membership has made it difficult to support the mission financially. There are a few ordained pastors and no worship center in Dakar, the capital city.

Missionaries

Missionaries have played multiple roles in Senegal, such as preacher, teacher, church planter, entrepreneur, healer, organizer, agronomist, and evangelist.

David Makobo N'shikala
Serving At: Senegal United Methodist Mission
Location: Senegal, Africa
Home Country: DRCongo, Africa
#3021869 - David Makobo N’Shikala is a missionary with the General Board of Global Ministries serving as an agriculturalist with the Senegal United Methodist Mission, based in Dakar.David Makobo N’Shikala is a missionary with the General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church serving as an agriculturalist with the Senegal United Methodist Mission, based in Dakar. He was commissioned in October 2013.
His work in Senegal involves assistance to farmers in making their labor and the land more productive. Senegal is a small country on the west coast of Africa. It lacks significant natural resources but is adaptable to the cultivation of millet and peanuts and the raising of livestock. The Senegal United Methodist Mission dates to 1989 and has some 19 congregations. Membership has grown steadily in the predominantly Muslim country.
David is a native of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and is a member of the Jerusalem Francophone Church in Lubumbashi in the South Congo Annual Conference. He was born at Mwajinga, a United Methodist mission where his parents have been teachers for more than 40 years. His elementary and secondary education was accomplished at Mwajinga, as was his early leadership training in the church. David received a Bachelor of Science degree in horticulture and a Master of Science degree in crop production from Africa University, a United Methodist institution, in Mutare, Zimbabwe. In 2010, he became the founding dean of the School of Agriculture at Katanga Methodist University in the DRC.
In Senegal, he teaches farmers how to “grow food in poor soil and how to use modern technologies to produce more.” He also works with church leaders to assist the mission in realizing its goal of becoming economically self-sufficient through the use of modern agricultural tools and methods. He also works with visiting Volunteer-in-Mission teams.
He has wide experience in The United Methodist Church on the local and connectional levels. He served as evangelist and spiritual leader of the praise band in the Jerusalem Francophone Church. He has received special training as an evangelist. At Africa University, he served on the chapel team and served as a French-English translator at local and international church events, including the Global Young People Convocation in South Africa.
David says that his dream is to help his fellow Africans through agriculture to become empowered and ward off poverty. “People in the rural areas are the most impoverished,” he says, “because access to education and other self-improvement opportunities” is lacking. He wants to expand those opportunities.
David is married to Solange Makobo.

 

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William (Bill) Gibson
Serving At: United Methodist Mission in Senegal
Location: Senegal, Africa

 

#3021475 - William (Bill) H. Gibson, Jr. is a missionary serving as mission director of the United Methodist Mission in Senegal.William (Bill) H. Gibson, Jr. is a missionary with the General Board of Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church serving as mission director of the United Methodist Mission in Senegal.
 
The United Methodist presence in Senegal, a predominantly Muslim nation, began in 1989 through disaster relief efforts of the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR). The church, a formal United Methodist Mission, was registered by the government in 1995, and is now engaged in organizing congregations and equipping pastors. Bill and his wife, Gwendolyn, formerly a missionary, traveled to Senegal in 2011 with the International Volunteers in Mission program.
 
Bill Gibson is a microbiologist with a passion for mission. Dr. Gibson—he holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois—is a native of Tennessee, where he attended high school and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Knoxville College. He earned a Master’s degree and doctorate in 1972 and 1975, respectively.
 
 
Bill was raised in Methodist and Cumberland Presbyterian homes. He became a United Methodist when he and Gwen joined The United Methodist Church in Highland Park, New Jersey. His career path was marked by several relocations, which resulted in membership transfers. Each new church family received the Gibsons warmly. Home is currently Appleton, Wisconsin, where Bill is a member of Emmanuel United Methodist Church and a lay member of the Wisconsin Annual Conference.
 
Bill has taught Sunday school, led Disciple Bible studies, worked on church fundraising drives, participated in the Emmaus community, supported UMCOR campaigns, taken part in CROP Walks Against Hunger, and chaired numerous church and district committees. His motto for life is, “Loving God is Loving People,” which was also the name of a workshop he led for the Aurora District Committee on Religion and Race (Northern Illinois Conference).
 
A sense of mission has been with William all his life. He was influenced by the example of his Methodist great-grandmother, his Cumberland Presbyterian grandmother, and the elders in his childhood church. He says that he found maturity in the teachings of John Wesley. “My work and associations through the Walk to Emmaus have helped me appreciate and accept the call to mission and discipleship and help prepare me for a life of faith and service.”
Bill and Gwendolyn are the parents of four adult children. They have three grandchildren.
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Supporting Conferences: Wisconsin Annual Conference

 

Additional Information:
  • Make an online donation to: #3021475.
  • Missionary Support Code: 3021475
  • Track Gifts for Current Year. For previous years, please use Online Gift Tracking and enter 3021475 for "Project Number.”
  • Last profile update: 15 Jan 2016

In Mission Together Partnerships

The In Mission Together coordinator provides training for U.S. churches to develop healthy partnerships as they move from short-term ministry to long-term relationships that build the capacity of the church in Senegal. The coordinator also connects the church in the United States with ministry in Senegal and assists with communication between the two. The In Mission Together coordinator for Senegal is David Phipps (imtwestafrica@gmail.com). Share your prayers and get real time updates by joining the Facebook group page for this Mission Initiative. Visit the page and click on “Join Group” to become a part of the conversation.

Be Involved

For more information or to become involved please contact Rev. Eunice Iliya, regional executive for Senegal (eiliya@umcmission.org), or you can give to the Senegal Mission Initiative, Advance #12594A.