What are the budget implications for education and particularly tech this year? Do you expect to see growing investment, or a decline?

In an interview conducted by Lisa Yeaton – Specialist, Content Marketing for Extreme Networks, Bob Nilsson, director of content and vertical solutions marketing presented his views on EdTech trends for this year. Among educators and IT managers, the biggest issue for 2019 is whether EdTech will deliver on the promise of improving educational outcomes and extending quality education to students of all backgrounds more efficiently and at lower cost than traditional styles of teaching. While many EdTech enhancements, such as digital text books and the increased use of video have had demonstrable results; other emerging styles, such as adaptive learning have shown some progress, but are yet to deliver definitive results.

Download the US 2019 Budget Summary and Background Information

According to the Campus Computing 2018 National Survey, IT budgets will continue to face reductions: “Fully two-thirds (68 percent) of the fall 2018 survey participants report that campus IT funding has not recovered from the recurring budget cuts that began for most institutions with the “Great Recession” in fall 2008.”

Luckily, technology advances like Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) mean expensive equipment can now be simulated or virtualized. Network infrastructure is getting faster, more tuneable to efficiently deliver bandwidth when and where it is needed. Migration to the cloud, outsourcing, and network infrastructure-as-a-service (NIaaS) are also providing new means to restructure the school budgets.

Bob Nilsson currently serves in a consulting capacity for Turner and Halcrow and has served as a consultant for SOM, Skanska, Greece for Technology Development, Thornton-Tomasetti and Gensler. Nilsson served in the U.S. Marine Corps for four plus years, where he became Captain and did tours in Europe, the Caribbean and Vietnam. He is the President and Founder of 100 Entrepreneurs Foundation where he serves as Board of Directors and also a Board Member of the SemperMax Fund, a Trustee and Governor and was a Trustee for the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and Member of the Marine Executive Association, among other prestigious organization involvement. 



Teaching Quality Health and Physical Education

by Dean Dudley, Amanda Telford, Claire | This practical new text will help pre- and in-service teachers to develop and implement quality health and physical education experiences in primary schools.

Teaching Quality Health and Physical Education
Ⓒ 2018ISBN 9780170387019Edition 1 344 Pages
AU / NZ
Published: 2017 by Cengage Learning Australia
Author/s: Dean Dudley / Charles Sturt University, Bathurst
Amanda Telford / RMIT University
Claire Stonehouse / Deakin University
Louisa Peralta / University of Western Sydney
Matthew Winslade / Charles Sturt University

 

Taught well, Health and Physical Education can provide purposeful, stimulating and challenging learning experiences. It can help children to develop sophisticated understanding, skill and capabilities through their bodies and to see greater meaning in not only what they are learning but also their wider lives; and it can enrich all other aspects of the curriculum.
This practical new text will help pre- and in-service teachers to develop and implement quality health and physical education experiences in primary schools. It introduces the general principles of teaching and learning in Health and Physical Education and explains why this learning area is an important part of the Australian Curriculum. Chapters then discuss considerations and practical implications for teaching both health and physical education using a strengths-based approach.
Packed with evidence-based and research-informed content, this valuable text also includes numerous examples and activities that help you bridge the gap from theory to real-world practice. Above all, it will give educators the confidence to teach primary health and physical education so that every child benefits.

 

Contents

Part 1: Introduction to the area
1. Introducing Health and Physical Education
2. Understanding quality Health and Physical Education
3. Overview of the Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education
4. Authentic learning and assessment in primary Health and Physical Education.
Part 2: Understanding and teaching about personal, social and community health
5. Pedagogies and issues in teaching for health
6. Exploring identity, help-seeking behaviour and decision making
7. Communicating for healthy relationships and wellbeing
8. Whole-school approaches to promoting health.
Part 3: Understanding and teaching about movement and physical activity
9. Planning for developmentally appropriate learning
10. Moving for purpose: skills, knowledge and values
11. Moving for life: experience and expression.

 

About the author (2017)

Dr Dean Dudley is a former Health and Physical Education Head Teacher and Director of Sport and now works as a physical education academic at Macquarie University. He is Senior Lecturer and Researcher of Health and Physical Education at Macquarie University, as well as Vice President (Oceania) of the International Federation of Physical Education and Chief Examiner (Personal Development, Health, and Physical Education) for the NSW Board of Studies and Teacher Education Standards. Dean was Expert Consultant on the Quality Physical Education Guidelines for Policymakers published by UNESCO in 2015. His research is focused on the assessment and reporting of physical education and the development of observed learning outcomes pertaining to physical literacy.

Amanda Telford is Associate in the School of Education at RMIT University. In addition to experience as an academic and as a health and physical education teacher, Amanda has experience as a company director of an organisation consisting of a network of over five thousand health and physical educators. She has been an advisor for state and federal governments in the area of Health and Physical Education and was involved in the development of the 2004 National Physical Activity Guidelines for children and young people. Her research focuses on the influence of family, community and school environments on youth physical activity behaviour.Claire Stonehouse lectures at Deakin University in Health Education, Student Wellbeing and Sexuality Education in both primary and secondary pre-service education. Claire has worked in many sectors of the community, and has experience writing curricula and educating young people. Her areas of interest include: sexuality education; the educational impact that parents have on their children; and opening up conversations about mental health.

Louisa Peralta is Senior Lecturer of Health and Physical Education in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. As an academic, Louisa teaches in the areas of primary and secondary Health and Physical Education and professional practice studies. Her teaching, research and publications focus on school-based programs for improving students’ physical activity levels and motivation, improving adolescent health literacy through whole school approaches, and designing and delivering professional learning experiences for preservice and inservice Health and Physical Education teachers.

Matthew Winslade is Associate Head of the School of Teacher Education and Course Director for Health and Physical Education at Charles Sturt University. Prior to moving into the tertiary sector he was both a Head Teacher in the state system and a Director of Sport in the Association of Independent Schools. His current research activities include evaluating school- and university-based health and physical activity programs, and the development of intercultural competency in pre-service teachers. Matt currently divides his time between Australia and Samoa, working closely with community groups and sporting organisations at both school and university level.



What is convergent validity and discriminant validity?

by Martyn Shuttleworth | The basic difference between convergent and discriminant validity is that convergent validity tests whether constructs that should be related, are related. Discriminant validity tests whether believed unrelated constructs are, in fact, unrelated.

Convergent validity and discriminant validity are commonly regarded as ways to assess the construct validity of a measurement procedure (Campbell & Fiske, 1959). Convergent validity tests that constructs that are expected to be related are, in fact, related. Convergent validity in short helps to establish construct validity when you use two different measurement procedures and research methods (e.g., participant observation and a survey) in data collection about a construct (e.g., anger, depression, motivation, task performance). Discriminant validity (or divergent validity) tests that constructs that should have no relationship do, in fact, have no relationship. Discriminant validity helps to establish construct validity by demonstrating that the construct you are interested in (e.g., anger) is different from other constructs that might be present in your study (e.g., depression). To assess construct validity in your research, you should first establish convergent validity, before testing for discriminant validity.

If a research program is shown to possess both of these types of validity, it can also be regarded as having excellent construct validity.

In many areas of research, mainly the social sciences, psychology, education and medicine, researchers need to analyze non-quantitative and abstract concepts, such as level of pain, anxiety or educational achievement.

A researcher needs to define exactly what trait they are measuring if they are to maintain good construct validity.

Constructs very rarely exist independently, because the human brain is not a simple machine and is made up of an interlinked web of emotions, reasoning and senses. Any research program must untangle these complex interactions and establish that you are only testing the desired construct.

This is practically impossible to prove beyond doubt, so researchers gather enough evidence to defend their findings from criticism.

The basic difference between convergent and discriminant validity is that convergent validity tests whether constructs that should be related, are related. Discriminant validity tests whether believed unrelated constructs are, in fact, unrelated.

Imagine that a researcher wants to measure self-esteem, but she also knows that the other four constructs are related to self-esteem and have some overlap. The ultimate goal is to maker an attempt to isolate self-esteem.

In this example, convergent validity would test that the four other constructs are, in fact, related to self-esteem in the study. The researcher would also check that self-worth and confidence, and social skills and self-appraisal, are also related.

Discriminant validity would ensure that, in the study, the non-overlapping factors do not overlap. For example, self esteem and intelligence should not relate (too much) in most research projects.

As you can see, separating and isolating constructs is difficult, and it is one of the factors that makes social science extremely difficult.

Social science rarely produces research that gives a yes or no answer, and the process of gathering knowledge is slow and steady, building on top of what is already known.

Bibliography
Domino G., & Domino M.L. (2006). Psychological Testing: An Introduction. (2nd Ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

John, O.P., & Benet-Martinez, V. (2000). Measurement: Reliability, Construct Validation, and Scale Construction. In Reis, H.T., & Judd, C.M. (Eds.). Handbook of Research Methods in Social and Personality Psychology, pp 339-370. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Struwig, M., Struwig, F.W., & Stead, G.B. (2001). Planning, Reporting, and Designing Research, Cape Town, South Africa: Pearson Education.

Martyn James Shuttleworth is an experienced freelance writer specializing in academic, technical, copy, and article writing. Possesses a broad range of writing skills and specialist knowledge in a number of areas, including science, history, construction, and environmental issues. He is well versed in a wide range of technical writing formats and styles. Connect via E-mail: info@freelance-writereditor.com



Preparing yourself for Careers of the Future

You don’t have to be at the top of your class to prepare yourself for careers of the future. However, you have to be well rounded in most disciplines and be dedicated to your studies and open to suggestions from your teacher or your professor. Today’s school administrators also need to rework their curriculum to include both technical and soft skills that will challenge and enable students to succeed in the future world of automation.

It doesn’t matter what your current career path is; you use skills in arts, science, technology, engineering, or math in one form or another every day. More knowledge in these areas of studies will no doubt help you in the careers of the future. And believe me, no one knows what careers of the future holds. What we do know is that as a High School student or College student, it’s imperative you force yourself to be proficient in arts, math, science, and technology. In the future world of automation, it will be very hard (but not impossible) to get by without some knowledge of arts, math, science, and technology.

Academics

You can start preparing yourself for careers of the future through academic courses. Here are some of the core courses to get you started while you’re still in high school or college.

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Statistics
  • Computational Biology
  • Molecular Biology as a Computational Science
  • Geography
  • Immunology
  • Physics
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Programming
  • Web Programming
  • Data Programming
  • Computer Science Principles
  • Computer Assisted Art
  • Research Methods
  • Introduction to Algorithms
  • Identities: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Probabilistic Robotics
  • Probability and Mathematical Statistics
  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Electronics
  • Environmental Science
  • Political science
  • Technical writing
  • Creative writing

Work Experience & Hobbies
Other ways to prepare yourself for careers of the future is through work experience and engaging is various hobbies. Some of these activities include but not limited to:

  • Fundraising event or other project involving budgeting and math skills.
  • Participate in a lobbying and census project to gain experience conducting interviews, analyzing data, and writing report of the project.
  • Volunteer at a math or science camp or after-school program.
  • Participate in a team programming class to develop software of interest in a team environment.
  • Before you recycle your old laptop or desktop computer, Google how to take them apart and put them back together.
  • Ask people close to you to hook you up for a summer intern at a place you really love to work at. The experience is what you’re shooting for, but it will be great if you can talk to the administrators into covering your transportation and lunch money for the duration of your intern.
  • Be a contributing member of your school club, especially robotics, math or science clubs.
    Push yourself to the limit on a project for a science fair.

There is no better way to prepare yourself for careers of the future than to be well rounded. A balance of exercise or sporting activities combined with a rigorous art project, coding competition with friends in modern computer languages such as JavaScript, Python, Java, SQL, Ruby, C#, C++, PHP are highly recommended.



Are We Born With Knowledge?

by Will Lyon while at the Boston University Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience | One thing I have always struggled with in reading philosophy is the doctrine of Innatism, which holds that the human mind is born with ideas or knowledge. This belief, put forth most notably by Plato as his Theory of Forms and later by Descartes in his Meditations, is currently gaining neuroscientific evidence that could validate the belief that we are born with innate knowledge of our world (Left to right: Plato, Kant, Nietzsche, Buddha, Confucius, Averroes).

The predominant belief and assumption about human learning and memory is that we are born as a “blank slate,” and we gain our knowledge and ideas through new experiences and our memory of them. This belief is known as Empiricism and, although dates back to Aristotle, has been supported by many famous philosophers such as John Locke and Francis Bacon. However, a study published in last March’s Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS) may, to an extent, discredit this main theory of knowledge collection. The research, conducted by the Blue Brain Group in Switzerland, explored the remarkable similarities in the neuronal circuitry in the neocortices of all brains. The study, summarized in this article in PNAS, essentially “discovered a synaptic organizing principle that groups neurons in a manner that is common across animals and hence, independent of individual experiences.” This discovery may have huge implications on our understanding of learning, memory, and development. The groups of neurons, or cell assemblies, appear consistently in the Neocortices of animals and are essentially cellular “building blocks”.

In many animals then, it may hold true that learning, perception, and memory are a result of putting these pieces together rather than forming new cell assemblies. According to Dr. Markram, “This could explain why we all share similar perceptions of physical reality, while our memories reflect our individual experience.” This is a remarkable example of the ways in which neuroscience and its research is revolutionizing our understanding of the ways in which we come to know and perceive our universe, while simultaneously answering major philosophical questions. While these findings may go against the incredibly popular empirical view of knowledge, they lend themselves very well to the notion of innate ideas. Plato and Descartes used this general theory to explain human reasoning. Plato believed that the human soul exists eternally, and exists in a “world of forms (or ideas)” before life; all learning is the process of remembering “shadows” of these forms here on Earth. While this idea is still a little out there for me at least (and it may take a little more scientific evidence to support that claim), Descartes’ claims seem very consistent with the Blue Brain Group’s findings.

Descartes proposed that the inborn ideas that we possess are those of geometric truths and all of our intelligence can be accessed through reason. Discussing ideas in his fifth meditation, he states “We come to know them by the power of our own native intelligence, without any sensory experience. All geometrical truths are of this sort — not just the most obvious ones, but all the others, however abstruse they may appear.” Another study supporting this notion is the result of research on “intuitive physics,” or the seeming understanding we possess of the physical behavior of objects in our universe without even thinking about it. In an article summarizing the study, Janese Silvey provides the example that “if a glass of milk falls off a table, a person will try to catch the cup but not the liquid spilling out. That person is reacting rather than consciously thinking about what to do.” The report on the actual experiment, by Susan Hespos and Kristy vanMarle, showed that infants possess expectations that, for example, objects still exist when they are hidden, and are surprised when these expectations are not met (surprise was indicated in the study by a longer looking time). Other experiments were conducted to demonstrate the understanding that infants from 2-5 months old have of cohesive properties, solidity of materials, and other basic physical characteristics of objects. The full report of the findings can be found here.

For me, the best news that comes out of this is that these new findings compromise both the philosophical doctrines of innatism and empiricism, opening up new discussions of exactly what knowledge and learning mean.

Markram’s Study on Synaptic Organization-PNAS

Physics for Infants-WIREs Cognitive Science

Descartes’ Theories of Innate Ideas-Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Plato’s Theory of Forms and Thoughts on Innate Ideas-Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Infants Understand More Than Thought-Columbia Daily Tribune

New Evidence for Innate Ideas-Blue Brain Group



When Academia Adopts Corporate Production Metrics

by Kevin L. Cope | Administrations impose industrial-style economic models on discipline-based departments, setting them against one another in the competition for resources. This arrangement encourages small groups of professors to band tightly together, to resist outside criticism, to develop in-house jargons, and to become ever more defensive, parochial, and, worse, elitist (it being impossible that ignorant outsiders could understand the products of the departmental mandarins, images: Pixabay)

A little more often than now and then, some ruse, hoax, or stratagem upends academe. Recently, a small pod of researchers scandalized “cultural studies” by publishing, in prestigious journals, a plethora of counterfeit studies: make-believe research addressing preposterous issues such as the relation between the intimate anatomy of pets and the gender identities of their masters or the need for a feminist updating of Mein Kampf. Less spectacular exposés have occurred throughout the recent history of higher education, whether the famous Sokal hoax of the 1990s, which embarrassed the global scientific community, or the works of my own college roommate, a product of the Irish Boston immigrant community, who masqueraded for months as an enraged black poet. When the cover for such shams is eventually blown, the conservative press enjoys a feeding frenzy, railing against professors who, more often than not, draw their salaries from public funds. Is the story quite so simple? After all, even hard-core leftist professors should be clever enough to avoid looking ridiculous in the evening news. What does this recurrent phenomenon tell us about higher education—and about contemporary conservatism?

Probably the most widely observed law is that of unintended consequences. The donors, alumni, and commercial contractors who influence universities, many of whom drift to the conservative side of the political spectrum, may unintentionally create conditions that induce the kind of excesses exposed by satirizing hoaxers. Despite their reputation for leftist thinking, revenue-hungry colleges and universities spend much of their time trying to navigate around a cleft within American conservatism. Whether through public events such as Rotary Club or alumni association meetings or whether through a host of in-house documents—“mission statements,” “strategic plans,” and “vision statements”—that take long to write but attract only a few readers, campuses present themselves both as ivory towers in which noble thoughts find a safe haven and as factories stamping out the “human capital” required to ensure western dominance in a high-tech future. The first vision might be described as the philosophical conservatism of Cardinal Newman, the second, the establishment conservatism of Lee Iacocca or, if not Donald Trump, perhaps Tim Cook or Rex Tillerson.

Few college or university presidents have read Cardinal Newman. They find it easier, especially in difficult financial times, to opt for the production line version of conservatism. The donor queue, they recognize, is longer among CEOs than among philosophizing prelates. Eager to give conservative boosters what they think they want, campus leaders compensate for declining public support by seeking more students (or, as they prefer to say, “clients”), more tuition, and more output. Forgetting that Euro-American industry has a labor, social, and religious, as well as economic, history, they import into higher education a stripped-down version of the industrial model in the hope that producing students will convince the public that higher education is practical—i.e., that it evidences what cautious old Cardinal Newman discounted as “utility.” The conceptual instability of this approach is seen in mixed nomenclature within university propaganda. Incoming students are “clients” but the institutions go on to “produce” degree recipients. Industries, however, may “produce” goods to sell to clients, they do not “produce” clients.

What has all this to do with fake scholarship and academic bombast? The substitution of industrial-style conservatism for the idealistic conservatism of Newman—i.e., what Newman calls “the habit of pushing things up to their first principles”—produces knock-on, or secondary, effects that lead to the overproduction of absurdities. First comes the Balkanizing of comprehensive universities—schools that claim to cover most recognized disciplines—into an array of institutes, centers, and programs where much of the funding comes from outside supporters rather than from institutional budgets that are open to public scrutiny. Such centers offer an escape from the claustrophobia of traditional academic departments, yet they also must continuously seek support, please donors and grantors, and produce—whether what is produced is good, bad, scientific, ideological, or merely attention-getting. Mimicking their production-obsessed parent university, centers and institutes pump up a blimp-load of research from a thin tithe. In my own university, we have a swollen “water campus” that arose as a response to Hurricane Katrina but that is now something of a paradoxical joint habitat for academics supporting conservative “sportsmen” who want to preserve their endangered hunting grounds and for liberals hoping to make anxieties about climate change look more practical than apocalyptic.

Interacting with the rise of institutes is a pseudo-capitalist version of academic tribalism. Administrations impose industrial-style economic models on discipline-based departments, setting them against one another in the competition for resources. This arrangement encourages small groups of professors to band tightly together, to resist outside criticism, to develop in-house jargons, and to become ever more defensive, parochial, and, worse, elitist (it being impossible that ignorant outsiders could understand the products of the departmental mandarins). Academic journals, similarly, develop clienteles, cadres of reviewers, and, in a word, gangs. Fraud becomes easy for anyone even close to insider status; youngsters are easily corrupted by the promise of frequent publication opportunities in exchange for being a team player. Thus, an emphasis on academic products rather than ideas seems to fulfill a “conservative” mandate but leads to zaniness.

The scholarship singed by the recent spoof arose from the liberal arts rather than the “STEM” (or, worse, “TED”) disciplines. Science has become the approved template for measuring academic productivity. Cardinal Newman may stress the seeking of first principles, but in donor- and revenue-driven academe, “science” has become confused with “product” or “effect.” The sciences routinely produce studies with hundreds of co-authors, many of whom have never read the study that they are credited with writing, by way of ensuring that everyone looks productive. Including everyone also ensures that no one will criticize the published work. As the science-originated multi-author, multi-reviewer model spreads, syndicates—dare I say “conspiracies”?—arise within all the disciplines. Researchers who are also publishing scholars “referee” contributions for publishers whose success improves those referees’ publishing prospects. Such an arrangement is efficient but not truthful; it produces, per one of Henry Ford’s assembly lines, but it does not judge. It also replicates the industrialist-conservative ideal of voluntary self-regulation—an ideal that may not always work, as the costly Takata air bag recall showed. The primary values ingrained in the self-regulated academic publishing system are speed, loyalty, and conformity. The primary result: scholarship that is at its best when, as is often the case, no one reads it.

In considering any of the sometimes arcane, sometimes trivial doings behind the ivy-covered walls, the hard question “why should anyone care about this?” easily arises. Occasionally, the answer is obvious. A patient would be well-advised to think twice before popping one of the countless pills promoted on late-night television but tested on only a half-dozen prisoners and a tiny tribe of graduate assistants in order to ensure that a researcher earns tenure, that a corporate donor sees results, and that departmental productivity metrics are met. With regard to the more abstruse “products” of scholars in the liberal arts, a more theoretical, if more old-fashioned and somewhat humorously religious, question occurs. That question is: will there be work (or tasks or jobs) in heaven? If there are journals, studies, and other academic products in the great beyond, the supply line behind them is likely to be infinite and the need or demand, in so happy a place, minimal. St. Peter is less likely to pay for a subscription than to receive complimentary copies; the pressure to meet production quotas will be low. From St. Thomas More we have learned that the utopian throws into contrast the folly of what we regard as commonplace or normal. Presumably the scholars in the saintly academy will prize honesty rather than voluminousness and truth rather than metrics.

Kevin L. Cope is Robert and Rita Wetta Adams Professor of English Literature at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He is the founder and editor of 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, the Co-General Editor of ECCB: The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography, and the author or editor of dozens of books and articles. He received his doctorate in literature from Harvard University in 1983.



Bingham University Karu

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website
Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018
Download Bingham University Karu Information Bulletin

Quality, Moral Education
1. Introduction

Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria. Its founding fathers, visionaries within the various Executive Councils, as well academics of ECWA extraction, looked back to the golden age of mission education with its focus, purposefulness, and high quality. It was the desire for meeting the soaring need for not only quality, secular education, but education that recognizes and integrates the moral and spiritual values on which the Christian faith is founded which fueled its establishment. Recognizing the importance of the technological revolution of the 19th and 20th centuries, Bingham University is determined to build a technology-driven institution of the 21st century.

The University has had four (4) Vice Chancellors since inception. The Pioneer Vice Chancellor was Professor Aaron Gana of blessed memory from 2006 to 2007. He was succeeded by Professor Felix I. Anjorin also of blessed memory, from 2007 to 2013 . The third Vice Chancellor was Professor Leonard KursimFwa from 2013 to 2017, while the fourth Vice Chancellor is Professor William Barnabas Qurix, OFR 2018 onward.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-contentedness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose-driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).

Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’ (Mark 10:45). The motto emphasizes the type of knowledge and skills, which the university impact on its students. The ultimate goal is to produce graduates who would see themselves as a task force out to serve the society.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.

The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.

It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



How Is a Man Not Like a Computer?

by Anthony Esolen | A computer, it appears to me, is a really sophisticated card catalogue, as robots are sophisticated puppets.

I have just read a fascinating and, to my mind, cheerful article, by the research psychologist Robert Epstein, on why your brain is not a computer—for the simple reason that your brain does not store memories in the way that a computer does, nor does it function according to algorithms. We are not computers but organisms, says Epstein, and we ought to “get over it,” meaning that we ought to stop dreaming of a time when we will achieve “immortality” by downloading the contents of the brain into a computer. Even if we could know what is strictly impossible to know, and we could describe at one moment the quantum states of every electron zipping along every synapse of every neuron in a human brain—a task that would require bigger numbers than if we could chart every star in the universe—we would still, absent the person to tell us these things, not be any the wiser as to what the person had experienced or was thinking.

“Misleading headlines notwithstanding,” says Epstein, “no one really has the slightest idea how the brain changes after we have learned to sing a song or recite a poem. But neither the song nor the poem has been ‘stored’ in it. The brain has simply changed in an orderly way that now allows us to sing the song or recite the poem under certain conditions. When called on to perform, neither the song nor the poem is in any sense ‘retrieved’ from anywhere in the brain, any more than my finger movements are ‘retrieved’ when I tap my finger on my desk. We simply sing or recite—no retrieval necessary.”

This, I think, makes what human beings do appear all the more wondrous. We have trained our dog, Jasper, to do upwards of seventy tricks. He jumps through a hoop, he rings a bell, he bangs the keys on his toy piano, and he flops to the ground and rolls over when I point my finger at him and say, “Bang!” What happens is that he has learned, as a whole dog—the whole canine organism from silky ears to plume-like tail—to interact with the world in a certain way that brings pleasure to him, in the form of praise and fun and treats. If we could “download” a human brain into a computer, then surely, a fortiori, we could do so with a dog—but here we see the analogy break down. What on earth could a dog’s brain in a computer possibly signify? Where is the dog himself, the creature interacting with the world, being changed by the world and changing the world in turn, as when he comes upon a telephone pole and sagaciously divines the message of a previous dog?

A computer, it appears to me, is a really sophisticated card catalogue, as robots are sophisticated puppets. The dog does not compute, and the computer does not prick up its ears and twitch its nose because a fox has been in the neighborhood. The dog does not download files, and the computer has no life experience. When it comes to human beings, then, Epstein says quite shrewdly that we really are unique, because no two people will react in the same way to the same things: I can hear Beethoven’s Fifth, and you can hear it, and yet in neither of us is the symphony simply imprinted on the memory for future retrieval, as when I download a file onto my computer, and it is there in the computer’s crystal, the same as if you had downloaded it, or the same as if I had downloaded it onto a different computer. We can have duplicate card catalogues, just as we used to have many thousands of telephone books with the same information in each, but not duplicate organisms, and therefore not duplicate human beings.

Epstein says that we are being misled by a model, a mere metaphor, one that we will need to discard, just as we discarded the mechanical model of gears and wheels that prevailed after Descartes, and just as we discarded the model “preserved in the Bible,” whereby men “were formed from clay or dirt, which an intelligent god [sic] then infused with its [sic] spirit.” I am guessing that Epstein the scientist brings up the Bible only to suggest that the current model of the brain as computer is as inadequate as this outdated explanation. He ought to reconsider what the verse from the Bible means. He has not taken it seriously. It is not meant to be a mechanical description of what goes on in the human organism: it has nothing to do with humors (bodily fluids such as bile or blood, which were thought to determine personality), gears and wheels, galvanic forces, or computer algorithms. It has instead to do with persons: the Creator and man.

There is a qualitative difference, as wide as the gap between nonexistence and existence, between the computer and any living organism, and indeed the more we learn about even the most elementary organisms, e.g., those of a single cell, the more the mind boggles at the sheer complexity of an amoeba or a paramecium—or of an organelle inside the paramecium, like the mitochondria. It is as if we might dive into reality, and find what looks like a new universe awaiting us at each level, so to speak. Yet even this does not do justice to the organism.

Consider again the card catalogue. Information in it is organized according to variations upon a simple algorithm: alphabetical order. It is also organized by kind: author, title, and topic. The computer is vastly more efficient and far-reaching in its capacity to deliver this information in a variety of ways and by a variety of commands. It functions, to give an obvious and powerful instance, as a big concordance, finding where words or strings of words are used here and there and everywhere. This is all fine, for human use. But it is not a living thing, nor is it close to a living thing. A very large dictionary is no closer to having life than is a small dictionary. A library is no closer to having life than is a postage stamp.

I may be giving too little credit here to the power of the algorithms whereby a computer does its sorting and filtering and locating, but I don’t believe I have misunderstood the principle. It is not that a computer is less complex than is an amoeba, but that the complexity of a computer is that of a machine, and not that of an organism. We need a new term, perhaps, one that will bring into play the intimacy of the interrelationships among the parts of the organism. “All for one, and one for all,” cried the Three Musketeers. Socioplex, perhaps?

Every identifiable part of an organism is related to the others in an intimate way, working as a whole; the part is what it is only by virtue of its participation in and of the whole. The whole is present in each part. An organism is not a funny kind of machine. Rather, a machine, as Etienne Gilson once noted, is a mock-organism, with interchangeable parts that work by means of contiguity and efficient causality alone. Think of a wheel on a car. If you take the wheel off the car, you can still use it as a wheel for a different kind of machine entirely, one that also rolls. The wheel is indifferent. The car is not “in” the wheel. The wheelbarrow is not in the handle.

I am, however, in my flesh and blood. We know now that the instructions for the building up of my whole body lie in each cell of mine. The cell is not mere stuff, a mere jelly to which an electric charge is imparted, as the materialists of the Enlightenment wanted to believe. To press an analogy, we might turn to Saint Paul: Christ, and not just an extrinsic jolt of divinity, is present in each member of the body of Christ. The bodies of organisms are organized as it were pneumatically, from within, infused throughout by the Spirit of life, which is personal, intentional, artistic, and creative: “You send forth your Spirit, and they are created,” says the Psalmist. If it was God’s intention from the beginning to build up the Body of Christ that is the Church, then it seems fit that bodies themselves should bear witness to this kind of organization, to a degree that Saint Paul himself could not have imagined.

To go from amoebas to my dog Jasper is, I think, to cross another gap as wide as a universe. He trembles on the verge of personality, as C.S. Lewis puts it. And then there is personality itself, the real thing. Here we come to the final choice, the one that atheists with good hearts want to delay or avoid. It is the choice between seeing the human person as reducible to a machine—a thing, even if the thing is a brute like an amoeba, or seeing him as a being capable of a relationship with God, because he is made as a person, by a Person, for knowledge and love.

The person, endowed as he is with reason and intellect, is as Thomas Aquinas says, capax omnium, i.e., capable of knowing (though in a manner proper to himself, and not as God knows) anything there is to be known, and not just as one detail after another, but as wholes to be grasped in their peculiar beauty. The telephone book does not know anything. For to know is to come into a relationship with the thing known, and if we are talking about intellectual knowledge, knowledge implies not just a brain, but a knowing person. If I say, “I know John,” I am not talking about anything that can be measured, such as John’s height and weight and age, all of which may be logged by a mechanical device. I am not even talking about biographical data, such as where John was born and where he lives now. I mean something for which the word “know” seems equivocal. I mean that John has entered into my life in some way, and that he, the person, means something to me that no collection of data can mean, nor any set of robotic instructions that might mimic the actions of a living being.

We really do come to the crux here, and this explains why a consistent materialist like Daniel Dennett must hold that our very consciousness is but an illusion. He knows that to take the person as an irreducible datum of human knowing and being-known is to depart from materialism, which he takes as a given. It is then also to turn toward the Person from whom all personhood derives. David Hart once jested that it was the dream of all young materialists someday to grow up to be robots. We may say, in the same spirit, that the dream of such Christian grubs as we are is to grow in the Lord Jesus Christ, and become persons at last indeed.

Professor Esolen is a teaching fellow and writer in residence at Thomas More College of the Liberal Arts, in Merrimack, New Hampshire. Dr. Esolen is a regular contributor to Crisis Magazine and the author of many books, including The Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization (Regnery Press, 2008); Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child (ISI Books, 2010) and Reflections on the Christian Life (Sophia Institute Press, 2013). His most recent books are Reclaiming Catholic Social Teaching (Sophia Institute Press, 2014); Defending Marriage (Tan Books, 2014); Life Under Compulsion (ISI Books, 2015); and Out of the Ashes (Regnery, 2017).



Bingham University: Transform a person into Knowledge and skills driven, Christ centered Individual

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website | Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018

Quality, Moral Tertiary Education In Nigeria
1. Preamble
Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria.  As the name implies, the University was named after one of the trio of pioneer Sudan Interior Missionaries, Roland Victor Bingham whose vision along with those of other founding fathers desired to produce committed Christians in our institutions, including the University through which Christ-centred leaders would emerge.   The founding fathers intend to meet the soaring need for not only quality secular tertiary education but education that recognises and integrates moral and spiritual values in the face of degenerating social decadence in Nigerian University campuses.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-centeredness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose -driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).
Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.
The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.
It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



Why Choose ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja (ETSI)?

For more than seventy years, ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja (ETSI) has been making a difference in students’ lives and ministerial career pathways. For those considering getting into ministry, for people who want to be better equipped for the ministry, for people seeking theological studies that will take them to new and exciting places, studying at ETSI is a gateway to new possibilities. Visit ECWA Theological Seminary Igbaja website
From its beginning in 1941, ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja (ETSI) has been centered on building generations of Pastors, Christian Educators, Missionaries and Christian leaders. Adhering to this vision enables the students of ETSI to tackle real world challenges within a Christian framework while making innovative contributions to the communities in which they live and serve. ETSI prepares its graduates with the necessary qualities, knowledge and problem- solving skills that ensure they stand tall among peers in the ministry.

Our campus location, size (landmass to student’s population) and smaller student body makes getting to know other students and staff so much easier – ensuring you don’t feel alone for very long! Attending ETSI is not just about attending lectures as we do have students from various part of Nigeria and some other African countries; we also provide enabling environment to enhance your experience and help you to achieve your study goals. It is a big family affair.

History

The ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja (ETSI) was established in 1941 by Rev. Dr. William G. Crouch, an American Missionary from California, who came to Nigeria on the platform of the Sudan Interior Mission (now Serving In Mission, [SIM]). The Institution is wholly owned and operated by Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA). It is located in Igbaja, Kwara State, Nigeria.

ETSI began to offer Bachelor of Theology (B.Th) degree in 1972. Today, there are five different Bachelor of Arts (B.A) degree programs, one of which is affiliated to the University of Ibadan (B.A. Christian Religious Studies). All our programs from Diploma to Doctor of Ministry are accredited by Association of Christian Theological Education in Africa (ACTEA).

In 1987, the Seminary introduced programs of Biblical and Pastoral Studies at the Master’s Degree level, thus becoming the first Evangelical Seminary in English – speaking West Africa to do so. The Seminary graduated her first set of Doctor of Ministry (D. Min) in 2003.

 Aims and Objectives of the Seminary

  1.  To provide sound and Bible-based theological education for men and women and to make them theologically adequate for the challenges of the 21st century.
  2. To train Christian men and women who are called into full-time or part-time Christian Ministry as Pastors, Evangelists, Missionaries, and Teachers of God’s Word in Primary and Secondary Schools, tertiary institutions, Military Chaplaincy in Nigeria and other Christian organizations.
  3. To give sound theological training that is relevant to the needs and aspirations of the church and societies in Africa.
  4. To train men and women to become committed to their calling, devoted to Jesus Christ and are, in turn, able to train others for the ministry of the Gospel (II Tim. 2:2).For more than seventy years, ECWA Theological Seminary, Igbaja (ETSI) has been making a difference in students’ lives and ministerial career pathways.
For those considering getting into ministry, for people who want to be better equipped for the ministry, for people seeking theological studies that will take them to new and exciting places, studying at ETSI is a gateway to new possibilities.In the midst of the many study opportunities available in theological education today, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, ETSI stands out.
ETSI’s programs in Bible and Theology, Mission and Evangelism, Christian Education, Pastoral Studies and Management & Organization Leadership offer a unique combination of academic and ministerial studies with a distinctively Evangelical perspective. Study at ETSI is not just about gaining a recognized ministerial ‘paper’ qualification; it’s also about preparing to make a difference to the world around you. Along the way, you’ll make life-long friendships with others on a similar journey, and encounter expert faculty and staff members who integrate genuine care for their students with wide-ranging professional skills and experience.
All together, ETSI offers something extra in your ministerial education experience. Good choices require good information, and at ETSI we want to make sure that you get the information you need. After reading through this prospectus or exploring the website, please don’t hesitate to contact ETSI if you have further inquiries. Of course, we welcome inquiries from all and sundries as well.

From its beginning in 1941, ETSI has been centred on building generations of Pastors, Christian Educators, Missionaries and Christian leaders. Adhering to this vision enables the students of ETSI to tackle real world challenges within a Christian framework while making innovative contributions to the communities in which they live and serve. ETSI prepares its graduates with the necessary qualities, knowledge and problem- solving skills that ensure they stand tall among peers in the ministry.

ETSI combines a commitment to academic excellence with a commitment to the truth of God’s word. We offer:

Certificate Programs
Theology
Pastoral Studies

Diploma Programs
Theology
Pastoral Studies
Christian Religious Studies (Affiliated to University of Ibadan, Nigeria)

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs
Theology
Christian Education
Mission and Evangelism
Pastoral Studies
Christian Religious Studies (Affiliated to University of Ibadan, Nigeria)

Graduate School Programs
Post Graduate Diploma (Theology)
M.A Christian Education
M.A Mission and Evangelism
M.A Pastoral Studies
M.A Old Testament
M.A New Testament
M. A Systematic Theology
Master of Divinity
M.A Leadership and Organizational Management (in Affiliation with DAI, USA)

Doctor of Ministry
*Pastoral Care and Counseling
*Pulpit Ministry
*Church Administration

Personal
ETSI has created a unique environment and culture – a distinction that distinguishes it from other Theological Seminaries. Studying at ETSI is a personal and friendly experience, where the focus is on individual support, spiritual growth and encouraging community life. We are passionate about bringing back straying sheep into the fold through disciplinary actions with the love of Christ.

Accreditation
ETSI occupies an integral niche within the theological education in Africa with rich background of aggregate experience of the faculty and staff.
• ETSI is approved by ACTEA
• ETSI is accredited by National Universities Commission
We are proud that our graduates consistently rate their course experience as part of the Africa continent’s best. Our size ensures that we can deliver academic excellence at undergraduate and postgraduate levels – with professional, real-world relevance being our highest priority.

Affordable
Pay as you study! At ETSI, fees are charged by credit hours offered, this plan makes studying at ETSI absolutely affordable and accessible for all eligible students. There is also, work scholarship plan for students.

Hands-on experience
Classroom learning is always enhanced in real world, real time experiences. ETSI has developed strong relationship with erudite scholars across the world that regularly come to deliver papers, lead seminars and workshops so that students are exposed to the major issues and ideas currently impacting their area of study within global space situation. Networking with these theological scholars also assists students to develop opportunities for their future.
ETSI offers practicum placements, internships and various other practical experiences in order for students to learn from real world experience in the ministry.

Flexible
Our courses have been developed to allow our students flexible study options. We recognise that study is just one aspect of a student’s life – there is employment to maintain, businesses to run, families to consider and personal commitments to juggle. We offered full-time, part-time (summer) and contact academic sessions; all of which help students to integrate their work, study and life in a personalized way that provides a balance suitable to them.

Committed faculty
Most of the faculty members have extensive proficient experience in their chosen field of study. They have a common vision to deliver more than just teaching excellence. Combine this with smaller classes, one-on- one mentoring and individualized study.

ETSI Campus Life
Our campus sits in a peaceful serene and scenic setting of Savannah grassland of Kwara, North Central Nigeria– easily accessible from the state capital. Hostels are provided for both single and married students.

Spiritual Life
We are determined to uphold the core Christian values and lead students by such values and standards. The Seminary Chapel programs range from daily worship, Sunday service and bible study meetings. Students are scheduled to minister and share their field experience for better and in-house practice of the ministry. Our Children and Teenager Churches are well supervised just in case you have children and wards. Women Bible School is also available for married students’ spouses who wish to stay with their husband in the course of study in ETSI.

Student Life
Our campus location, size (landmass to student’s population) and smaller student body makes getting to know other students and staff so much easier – ensuring you don’t feel alone for very long! Attending ETSI is not just about attending lectures as we do have students from various part of Nigeria and some other African countries; we also provide enabling environment to enhance your experience and help you to achieve your study goals. It is a big family affair.

Facilities
The school has well equipped library, top notched hostel facilities and WI-FI internet facilities around the campus for easy learning. In addition, the school main power generating set provides energy during public power outage. Portable water is provided in all hostels and lecture rooms areas. There is also adequate security system in place to safeguard life and properties.

Peer group support
Starting school can be a bit daunting; the good news is ETSI has a peer support program through its Student body just for you. It is run by students for students aimed at helping you settle into life at ETSI

Recreation and Sport
We encourage sporting activities as a way of keeping fit such as football, basketball, volleyball, badminton and table tennis

How do I apply?

We consider each applicant to Smart University as a whole person, and put enormous care into evaluating every application. Applying to ETSI is simple! Persons desiring to enter ETSI for any of our programs from certificate to doctoral degree must apply by obtaining form, fill and submit on or before the 28th day of February and or the 30th of September to the Admission & Students Records Unit of the Registry. The entrance exam and oral interview is conducted in the months of March and October respectively. You will be notified of the dates of exam and interview



What it Means to be an Educated Human Being

by Deacon James H. Toner | The mark of the educated, we used to hear, is the willing acknowledgment that one knows he does not know, or, at least, knows that he does not know enough (image: Respected Woman).

We are born and live in a certain location and in a certain time. By what appears to be the caprice of geography and chronology, we are thus, in a sense, “locked into” a particular place and period. In other words, we are trees in a forest we cannot descry; consequently, gaining perspective—seeing macroscopically instead of only microscopically—is an onerous task.

To educate comes from the Latin educere, meaning to “lead out.” Wise education may lead us, as both Plato and Cardinal Newman knew so well, out of the shadows and into the sun. I write “may lead us” because one cannot be educated against his will. Arrogance or indolence, corruption or conceit—any of these, or all of these, may frustrate learning (see CCC #2038, #2526), leaving one in a mental or moral stupor, or in a kind of academic autism, prized by some because it neither issues mental challenges nor makes moral demands.

Genuine education is rooted in the kind of timeless perspective which modern society arrogantly abjures. Such education provides depth and breadth. Alexander Pope’s idea that we ought to “drink deep or taste not the Pierian spring” has much to commend it, for a little learning is, in fact, a dangerous thing: it distorts reality, and it misinforms by providing only a small sample of fact. To say, “Professor Smith came to class sober today,” while true, leads to distortion—and to defamation (because Professor Smith never comes to class inebriated). Learning by sound bite is like reading only by skimming or eating only on Thursdays.

The ideologization (forgive that noun) of education; grade inflation; the inanity of “safe spaces,” free from reasoned, if politically unpopular, moral discourse; the rather common notion that sustained lucubration—hard work!—is no longer necessary in secondary or college work, abetted by frequent lack of academic rigor; the increasingly ubiquitous belief that college is about fun and success in social life, sporting events, or spousal pursuit; and the rampant moral chaos and confusion that mark so much of contemporary “higher learning”—all lead one to fear for the Republic and, much more critically, for the salvation of souls. “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge,” prophesied Hosea (4:6).

The mark of the educated, we used to hear, is the willing acknowledgment that one knows he does not know, or, at least, knows that he does not know enough. The madding crowd, however, will read, or hear, or watch nothing that confronts the prejudice of the day. As Fr. James Schall teaches in A Line Through the Human Heart (of course, decrying these opinions): Abortion, same-sex “marriage,” and euthanasia are our social rights. The poor are poor because the rich are rich. The earth is over-populated, and man himself is the chief threat to the wellbeing of our planet. Islam is a religion of peace. War is always immoral. Democracy is always the best form of government, and governments exist to protect the rights they munificently give us. There is no truth; sin does not exist; and there is no final divine judgment. That these chichi views may be the stuff of rank prejudice seems utterly to escape the glitterati.

We are told, moreover, that we must learn and appreciate the words of our day, which define reality for us and point to the challenges we face: democracy, diversity, equality, inclusivity, marginalization, misogyny, racism, sexism, homophobia, imperialism, colonialism, progressivism, autonomy (among others). These thirteen words are sheer cant (meaning hypocritical and sanctimonious talk); they are suggested by Anthony Esolen, who, in Out of the Ashes, says that they “are simply terms of political force and have no real meaning anymore.”

Newly minted graduates have learned, or so say a large number of commencement speakers, to “think for themselves.” Thus does academic autism parade as celebrated moral and mental autonomy. Contemporary education is emphatically modern; that such modernism is “the synthesis of all heresies” (as Pope St. Pius X put it) and may be riddled with error—e.g., “abortion is health care”—is unthinkable to many, marinated in their own sophistry (cf. James 3:13-17).

“The best that has been thought and said,” wrote Matthew Arnold, is hardly limited to what is novel. Yet anything current or contemporary must be better, or so we disdainfully think, than what is old. Such a belief, as C.S. Lewis taught us, is mere “chronological snobbery.” As long ago as 1926, Everett Dean Martin (1880-1941) wrote: “No one who is merely a creature of his own times is really educated.” He also believed that “unless education ennobles the mind, one becomes only a well-informed cad.”

If what is true, good, and beautiful depends only upon the prevailing taste in a given time or place, then everything is relative, and everything depends upon current fashion or fad. Then authority depends only upon power or privilege. Then what is sacred, or noble, or even decent results only from popularity, and might makes right. Then there is no point to or purpose in liberal education, for there is nothing to liberate us from; we are wretched, and we can separate good from evil only on the basis of the biggest guns or the most money or the greatest fame. Education thus becomes immersion only in what is thought or said or done, and never in what ought to be thought, or said, or done.

All this, of course, is exactly why G.K. Chesterton said: “the Catholic Church is the only thing which saves a man from the degrading slavery of being a child of his age.”

Dare to challenge the false education of the day—grounded in libertinism, socialism, utopianism, pantheism, inclusivity, diversity, syncretism, or pacifism—and you will be branded as xenophobic, Islamophobic, homophobic, transphobic—and probably misogynist and fascist as well.

By and large, academics are nothing if not progressive, nothing if not “truth vandals” (to use Felipe Fernandez-Armesto’s term). Modern education so often teaches the shadow of ethical relativism and not the sun of truth because it subscribes to the first, the fundamental, the forever temptation of regarding the creature as Creator (Rom 1:25).

That temptation is so strong that it insinuates itself into much that we say and hear—and it even, at times, flows from the pens and the tongues of those ordained to resist it and to remind us, with St. Paul, that we must never conform ourselves to the abominations of our times but, rather, seek and do the will of God (cf. Rom 12:1-3), which we know through the Magisterium of the Church.

One wishes it were otherwise, but donning a biretta or a zucchetto is never a guarantee of wisdom (cf. Is 47:10, Jer 8:9, 1 Cor 1:19-20). At its best and wisest, however, the Church is always our Mother and our Teacher, for the Church, with Job, hears God: “To be wise, you must have reverence for the Lord. To understand, you must turn from evil” (28:28).

By Deacon James H. Toner
Deacon James H. Toner, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Leadership and Ethics at the U.S. Air War College, a former U.S. Army officer, and author of Morals Under the Gun and other books. He has also taught at Notre Dame, Norwich, Auburn, the U.S. Air Force Academy, and Holy Apostles College & Seminary. He serves in the Diocese of Charlotte.



The Journey: Pope and Saint (1920-2005)

by John Alex | The life of Pope Saint John Paul (Holyart.com).

Pope and Saint John Paul II, was born Karol Józef Wojtyła on May the 18th, 1920, in Wadowice, Poland to a prosperous and Catholic family. His father was an officer in the army.  The future Pope had a happy childhood and he loved sports. He was also an excellent student. However, most of his family died by the then he was twenty.  The young Karol attended the best university in Poland. During World War II, Poland was invaded and they closed the universities and Karol was forced to work as a laborer. During a rebellion by the Poles against the Nazis, he was very lucky not to have been shot. During the war, he saw many terrible things and he drew ever closer to God.

During the German occupation, he saved the several Jews from death at the hands of the Nazis. He was later honored in Israel for his bravery and courage in saving these people.

At the end of the war, the future Pope  continued his studies and he was ordained a priest in 1946. He was a brilliant young man and he was sent to Rome to study further. Father Karol as he was known then, returned to Poland and worked as a parish priest in rural Poland. He was very happy as a parish priest and would later recall this time as being especially happy.

Poland was now ruled by Communists who hated all religions. The secret agents and police would spy on and harass Catholics, including the future Pope John Paul. In 1958 at a very young age John Paul was appointed Archbishop. Now, he defended Catholics against the communists even though it meant that he was often in real danger.

The young Pope John Paul had a brilliant mind and was invited by the Pope to take part in the Second Vatican Council.  The future Pope wrote several important Encyclicals. These were very significant in that they forbade Catholics from using contraception. One of the future Pope’s Encyclicals stated that it was a mortal sin for any believer to get an abortion. Pope John Paul wrote a great deal and his books are still read today.  He greatly impressed the Pope and in 1967, John Paul was elected a Cardinal. The future Pope was in effect the leader of the Catholic Church in Poland and he did much to help his homeland and defend the church from attacks by the communists.

After the sudden death of Pope John Paul I, he was elected Pope. He took the name Pope John Paul II out of respect for his predecessor. He was the first Pope from outside Italy in over four centuries.

John Paul immediately began to change the Papacy. He wanted to be a ‘people’ s Pope’. He traveled widely and visited many countries.  He was hugely popular among Catholics and non-Catholics. Pope John Paul would attack all forms of social injustice and tyranny.

This was to have important consequences in his homeland. The fact that the Pope was Polish inspired many Poles to resist communism. Because of this in 1980 the Soviet Union tried to kill the Pope. Despite being shot several times, the Pope managed to survive by a miracle.  This only made him more popular and he inspired even more people in Eastern Europe to resist their communist governments. Many believe that this led to the end of communism in Europe in 1989.

As Pope, he often attacked the greed of western society.  He was also a peacemaker and condemned all forms of violence.

John Paul was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in the late 1990s.  Still he continued to work and continued to travel. Despite being in great pain he was cheerful and he inspired many. Pope John Paul II refused to retire and continued as Pope until his death in 2005. His death was widely mourned all over the world.

Not long after he died there were many miracles reported. Many people who had prayed to the dead Pope claimed that they had been healed of serious diseases. Because of all these miracles Pope John Paul was beatified and he was canonized a saint in 2014. He was one of the most popular Popes in history and many call him Pope John Paul the Great.

Author Bio:John Alex works with Holyart.com offers Catholics a wide range of religious items.  You may follow him on Twitter.

 



ECWA USA DCC Youth Conference 2017

by Rev. Innocent Nwaobasi | I am writing to ask for your prayers and supports again as the youths meet in Maryland
When: July 13-16th 2017
Where: ECWA Maryland
 
The youth Conference is around the corner from July 13-16th 2017 at Maryland. We appreciate your prayers and supports for our faithful sons and daughters who love the Lord and are involved in our church programs in our various churches in ECWA USA DCC.

 I am writing to ask for your prayers and supports again as the youths meet in Maryland to discuss issues of great importance to them, that will help them grow in the Lord. Any amount the Lord has deposited in your heart to give as a support, I appeal to you to do so. Remember God love a cheerful giver and reward cheerful giving (1 Corinthians 9:7 & Luke 6: 380). As you give God bless you. Please pass this information to all your friends, sons and daughters.
Please support our youth. Send your check to ECWA USA, for Youth Conference Maryland:
Bukky Olaoye
% ECWA Atlanta
2004 Oak Terrace Drive
Atlanta GA 30316.
 
 


Sheltered Through the Storm: The Travails and Ultimate Triumph of the Church

Redemption Press / 2017 / Paperback

In Stock
CBD Stock No: WW141730

Contents

The Islamic State Europe and America
 
Its Time to Know What and Why You Believe
 
A Godly Response from the Church
 
Authors Note
 
Endnotes
 
Copyright

As storms of persecution, betrayals, and attacks face believers worldwide, many are filled with fear and wonder if God has abandoned His people. Michael Jolayemi says the Church must be courageous, and reach out to help a frightened world. The gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ is the only effective weapon against terrorism and social injustice. He challenges the Church to live holy in a perverted world that seeks to destroy its godly heritage, and return to its total dependence on the basic truths of the Word of God.

Open Doors, a ministry serving persecuted Christians worldwide, says, “Each month, 322 Christians are killed for their faith, 214 churches and Christian properties are destroyed, and 772 forms of violence are committed against Christians (such as beatings, abductions, rapes, arrests and forced marriages).” As the world groans in turmoil and pains, with palpable fear enveloping the entire globe, the most troubled people, under severe attacks from the evil world are the Christians and the Jews. The Pew Research Center says over 75 percent of the world’s population live in areas with severe religious restrictions (and many are Christians). The Church faces many challenges today which include:

  • Unprecedented attacks from without and within
  • Radical Islamic terrorism spreading fear
  • A deterioration of morality and Judeo-Christian values
  • A lack of dependence on the absolute truth of God’s Word.

Fear is a by-product of the storms of persecution, betrayals, and difficulties facing believers worldwide. The author of Sheltered Through the Storm: The Travails and Ultimate Triumph of the Church, seeks to combat that fear with faith. “A fear-stricken church cannot help a scared world. We will never convince the world there is peace at the cross if we continue to exhibit the same fears as those who make no profession of Christianity.”

In the face of radical Islamic terrorism, persecution, and the deterioration of morality and Judeo-Christian values, Michael Jolayemi says the church must be courageous in reaching out to help a frightened world. “The gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ is the only effective weapon against terrorism and social injustice.” He challenges the church to live holy in a perverted world that seeks to destroy its godly heritage. Above all, the message of Sheltered Through the Storm is for the Church to return to its total dependence on the basic truths of the Word of God, and trust in the eventual triumph of good over evil.

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Sheltered Through the Storm: The Travails and Ultimate Triumph of the Church

Sheltered Through the Storm: The Travails and Ultimate Triumph of the Church

Sheltered Through the Storm: The Travails and Ultimate Triumph of the Church



Seeing Christ in Others

“No one has ever seen God. Yet, if we love one another, God remains in us, and His love is brought to perfection in us.” —1 John 4:12

What do you see when you look into the eyes of the homeless woman pushing a cart down the sidewalk in front of you, the guy who cut you off in line at the grocery store, or the office colleague who just took credit for your hard work? Do you see someone to pity, to tolerate, to despise — or do you see the face of Christ?

If we’re honest, most of us would have to admit that seeing Christ in some of the people we meet in the course of a day is beyond challenging, and yet that is exactly what we are called to do, what Jesus Himself told us to do: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” But He didn’t stop there. Jesus gave us an even more difficult teaching that goes hand-in-hand with the second part of the “greatest commandment.”

“Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” He said, giving us a Gospel challenge that flies in the face of our human instinct for self-protection and society’s admonition to look out for number one. How can we learn to see Christ not only in the innocent face of a newborn baby or in the eyes of a beloved spouse or in the touch of an elderly parent, but also in the people who make our lives difficult in one way or another?

“It’s challenging to see Jesus in an ‘enemy,’ someone who may be attacking us, ridiculing us, or who has harmed us in some way. Where could Jesus be in that person? we wonder,” says Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle, EWTN Television host and Catholic author. “I believe the only possible way we can discover Jesus in our ‘enemies’ is through God’s grace and an effort on our part to act upon that grace and further, to commit ourselves to finding Jesus in everyone. This can only happen through prayer.”

O’Boyle, who is the author of “Rooted in Love: Our Calling as Catholic Women” among many other books on Catholic spirituality, says the most profound instance she’s ever had of seeing Jesus in “the distressing disguise of the poorest of the poor,” as Blessed Mother Teresa used to say, was when she encountered a crippled homeless woman sitting on the side of a street in Rome, Italy. Numerous tumors poked out of the woman’s sparse gray hair.

“My heart was intensely affected at the sight of her and I wanted to scoop her up off the street and save her from her homeless life. Instead, through tears, I kissed her hands, prayed with her, and gave her a blessed Miraculous Medal. I overwhelmingly saw Jesus in this woman and I wanted to love and comfort Him in her,” she recalled.

Many of us will never have that kind of dramatic “Aha!” moment, but there are still plenty of opportunities in the course of a typical day to see Jesus in the eyes of a spouse or child or friend who might be causing us unhappiness or discomfort, even if they are not an “enemy.”

“I can’t merely look for Jesus in a crippled homeless woman. I need to discover Him within the ones I love who might not be acting very loving. I firmly believe that we grow in holiness when we choose to serve Jesus in our spouses and family members when they are acting out or are in rare form. During those difficult moments when we respond in love, many graces are to be found and our hearts and their hearts are transformed,” says O’Boyle, who is quick to stress that we are all works-in-progress and so we will not be able to live up to the Gospel ideal at all times. Still, with regular prayer, we can move ever closer.

“We must trust Him to present the opportunities for grace in our lives — the people, the situations — and we must pray that we will respond to His grace to serve everyone with love. It doesn’t just happen. We have to pray and tenaciously use our will for the good — always,” O’Boyle says.

“Whenever I meet someone in need, it is really Jesus in his most distressing disguise.” –Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Beginning with Prayer

In her autobiography, “The Story of a Soul,” St. Thérèse of Lisieux writes about one particular nun who got under her skin, saying the woman irritated her no matter what she said or did.

“As I did not want to give way to my natural dislike for her, I told myself that charity should not only be a matter of feeling but should show itself in deeds. So I set myself to do for this sister just what I should have done for someone I loved most dearly,” St. Thérèse wrote.

Every time she met this nun, she prayed for her. She did things for her day after day, and when she thought she might say something unpleasant about her, she smiled instead.

“And after all this she asked me one day with a beaming face, ‘Sister Thérèse, will you please tell me what attracts you so much to me? You give me such a charming smile whenever we meet,’” St. Thérèse recalled. “Ah! It was Jesus hidden in the depths of her soul who attracted me, Jesus who makes the bitterest things sweet!”

St. Thérèse, Blessed Mother Teresa, and so many other saints and holy men and women remind us by their words and example – by their very lives – that seeing Christ in others isn’t always easy, but it is always necessary for those who strive to live out the Gospel. They provide us with a template for making this beautiful ideal a practical reality in our lives.

As St. Thérèse shows us, it must begin with prayer and with an understanding that the sayings of Jesus are not just pretty platitudes but a “to do” list for those of us who call ourselves His disciples. The first step could simply be to pray for a person who irritates us whenever we find ourselves upset by that person, or even to pray for our children rather than yell about juice spilled on the clean kitchen floor or forgotten homework that now must be driven in to school.

There’s another key element to our success in seeing Christ in others, however. Let’s go back to the second part of the greatest commandment: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” We cannot recognize Christ in others if we don’t first recognize Christ in ourselves.

We need to claim our belovedness, accept into our hearts and souls the reality that we are loved by God beyond measure just as we are at this very moment, flaws and all. And that same God who loves us so completely loves the guy who stole your parking spot at the mall just as much. That’s true love. Often times we don’t consider ourselves worthy enough for that kind of total and all-encompassing love. If we don’t see ourselves as worthy, it’s very hard to see anyone else as worthy either. So this work begins with us, right where we are.

An Interior Revolution

“The greatest challenge of the day is: How to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us.” – Dorothy Day

Lynn Goodman-Strauss is known as “The Egg Lady” on the streets of Austin, Texas, because for years she was out on the day labor corner at 7:30am every day handing our hard-boiled eggs, tortillas and hot coffee to those who were hungry, worn out, and losing hope. She also happens to run Mary House, the Catholic Worker residence in that city.

When she’s not handing out food, Goodman-Strauss drives homeless people to AA meetings, lets them shower or even live at Mary House, gives them clothes, and offers them prayers. She reaches out a hand where many would recoil in fear. She told the story once of how one man she’d been helping stole her car. She said it without a hint of anger, without an ounce of regret. Then she boiled more eggs and went back out to the streets.

Most of us are not called to that kind of drastic life of service, but we are called to do what we can in our corner of the world, even if it’s just a cubicle in a busy office, or in a classroom of a local school, or in the kitchen of our home.

Of course, Goodman-Strauss is following in the footsteps of Catholic Worker co-founder Dorothy Day, now on the road to canonization. Dorothy Day’s faith was lived out in service to – and in solidarity with – the poor. She showed us that true Gospel compassion requires a deep recognition of the fact that we are all brothers and sisters in Christ, all deserving of the same dignity and love.

Service to the poor, then, isn’t so much generosity as it is our duty as followers of Jesus — and this duty is something that is never to be resented or forced but embraced because we understand in a very practical way the words of Jesus: “Whatsoever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did it for Me.” (Mt. 25:40)

“I believe in person to person. Every person is Christ for me, and since there is only one Jesus, that person is the one person in the world at that moment. I see Christ in every person I touch, it is as simple as that.” – Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Walking the Talk

Even with the best of intentions, even with prayer and grace and self-acceptance, it can still be hard to look into the eyes of someone who is hurting us or someone on the margins and see Christ there. It requires a certain amount of detachment — to not take things personally, to forgive when we want justice to be served, to see past a rough or disheveled exterior.

Becoming Jesus to others and seeing Jesus in others is really a lifelong journey, one that may take us two steps forward and one step back. But as long as we are always focused on the end “goal” and rooted in prayer, we will keep moving forward, however slowly, and in doing so we will transform our hearts, transform our lives, and transform our world.

“All guests to the monastery should be welcomed as Christ, because He will say, ‘I was a stranger and you took me in.’” – Rule of St. Benedict, Chapter 53

Tony Rossi, works at the Catholic media organization, The Christophers, that allowed him to indulge his interest in religion, media, and pop culture. He served as The Christophers' TV producer for 11 years, and is currently the host and producer of the organization's radio show/podcast Christopher Closeup, writer and editor of their syndicated Light One Candle column, and producer/scriptwriter of the annual Christopher Awards ceremony.

To request a pdf or mailed copy of “Seeing Christ in Others,” email your request to radio@christophers.org