Preparing yourself for Careers of the Future

You don’t have to be at the top of your class to prepare yourself for careers of the future. However, you have to be well rounded in most disciplines and be dedicated to your studies and open to suggestions from your teacher or your professor. Today’s school administrators also need to rework their curriculum to include both technical and soft skills that will challenge and enable students to succeed in the future world of automation.

It doesn’t matter what your current career path is; you use skills in arts, science, technology, engineering, or math in one form or another every day. More knowledge in these areas of studies will no doubt help you in the careers of the future. And believe me, no one knows what careers of the future holds. What we do know is that as a High School student or College student, it’s imperative you force yourself to be proficient in arts, math, science, and technology. In the future world of automation, it will be very hard (but not impossible) to get by without some knowledge of arts, math, science, and technology.

Academics

You can start preparing yourself for careers of the future through academic courses. Here are some of the core courses to get you started while you’re still in high school or college.

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Statistics
  • Computational Biology
  • Molecular Biology as a Computational Science
  • Geography
  • Immunology
  • Physics
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Programming
  • Web Programming
  • Data Programming
  • Computer Science Principles
  • Computer Assisted Art
  • Research Methods
  • Introduction to Algorithms
  • Identities: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Probabilistic Robotics
  • Probability and Mathematical Statistics
  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Electronics
  • Environmental Science
  • Political science
  • Technical writing
  • Creative writing

Work Experience & Hobbies
Other ways to prepare yourself for careers of the future is through work experience and engaging is various hobbies. Some of these activities include but not limited to:

  • Fundraising event or other project involving budgeting and math skills.
  • Participate in a lobbying and census project to gain experience conducting interviews, analyzing data, and writing report of the project.
  • Volunteer at a math or science camp or after-school program.
  • Participate in a team programming class to develop software of interest in a team environment.
  • Before you recycle your old laptop or desktop computer, Google how to take them apart and put them back together.
  • Ask people close to you to hook you up for a summer intern at a place you really love to work at. The experience is what you’re shooting for, but it will be great if you can talk to the administrators into covering your transportation and lunch money for the duration of your intern.
  • Be a contributing member of your school club, especially robotics, math or science clubs.
    Push yourself to the limit on a project for a science fair.

There is no better way to prepare yourself for careers of the future than to be well rounded. A balance of exercise or sporting activities combined with a rigorous art project, coding competition with friends in modern computer languages such as JavaScript, Python, Java, SQL, Ruby, C#, C++, PHP are highly recommended.



Are We Born With Knowledge?

by Will Lyon while at the Boston University Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience | One thing I have always struggled with in reading philosophy is the doctrine of Innatism, which holds that the human mind is born with ideas or knowledge. This belief, put forth most notably by Plato as his Theory of Forms and later by Descartes in his Meditations, is currently gaining neuroscientific evidence that could validate the belief that we are born with innate knowledge of our world (Left to right: Plato, Kant, Nietzsche, Buddha, Confucius, Averroes).

The predominant belief and assumption about human learning and memory is that we are born as a “blank slate,” and we gain our knowledge and ideas through new experiences and our memory of them. This belief is known as Empiricism and, although dates back to Aristotle, has been supported by many famous philosophers such as John Locke and Francis Bacon. However, a study published in last March’s Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS) may, to an extent, discredit this main theory of knowledge collection. The research, conducted by the Blue Brain Group in Switzerland, explored the remarkable similarities in the neuronal circuitry in the neocortices of all brains. The study, summarized in this article in PNAS, essentially “discovered a synaptic organizing principle that groups neurons in a manner that is common across animals and hence, independent of individual experiences.” This discovery may have huge implications on our understanding of learning, memory, and development. The groups of neurons, or cell assemblies, appear consistently in the Neocortices of animals and are essentially cellular “building blocks”.

In many animals then, it may hold true that learning, perception, and memory are a result of putting these pieces together rather than forming new cell assemblies. According to Dr. Markram, “This could explain why we all share similar perceptions of physical reality, while our memories reflect our individual experience.” This is a remarkable example of the ways in which neuroscience and its research is revolutionizing our understanding of the ways in which we come to know and perceive our universe, while simultaneously answering major philosophical questions. While these findings may go against the incredibly popular empirical view of knowledge, they lend themselves very well to the notion of innate ideas. Plato and Descartes used this general theory to explain human reasoning. Plato believed that the human soul exists eternally, and exists in a “world of forms (or ideas)” before life; all learning is the process of remembering “shadows” of these forms here on Earth. While this idea is still a little out there for me at least (and it may take a little more scientific evidence to support that claim), Descartes’ claims seem very consistent with the Blue Brain Group’s findings.

Descartes proposed that the inborn ideas that we possess are those of geometric truths and all of our intelligence can be accessed through reason. Discussing ideas in his fifth meditation, he states “We come to know them by the power of our own native intelligence, without any sensory experience. All geometrical truths are of this sort — not just the most obvious ones, but all the others, however abstruse they may appear.” Another study supporting this notion is the result of research on “intuitive physics,” or the seeming understanding we possess of the physical behavior of objects in our universe without even thinking about it. In an article summarizing the study, Janese Silvey provides the example that “if a glass of milk falls off a table, a person will try to catch the cup but not the liquid spilling out. That person is reacting rather than consciously thinking about what to do.” The report on the actual experiment, by Susan Hespos and Kristy vanMarle, showed that infants possess expectations that, for example, objects still exist when they are hidden, and are surprised when these expectations are not met (surprise was indicated in the study by a longer looking time). Other experiments were conducted to demonstrate the understanding that infants from 2-5 months old have of cohesive properties, solidity of materials, and other basic physical characteristics of objects. The full report of the findings can be found here.

For me, the best news that comes out of this is that these new findings compromise both the philosophical doctrines of innatism and empiricism, opening up new discussions of exactly what knowledge and learning mean.

Markram’s Study on Synaptic Organization-PNAS

Physics for Infants-WIREs Cognitive Science

Descartes’ Theories of Innate Ideas-Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Plato’s Theory of Forms and Thoughts on Innate Ideas-Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Infants Understand More Than Thought-Columbia Daily Tribune

New Evidence for Innate Ideas-Blue Brain Group



When Academia Adopts Corporate Production Metrics

by Kevin L. Cope | Administrations impose industrial-style economic models on discipline-based departments, setting them against one another in the competition for resources. This arrangement encourages small groups of professors to band tightly together, to resist outside criticism, to develop in-house jargons, and to become ever more defensive, parochial, and, worse, elitist (it being impossible that ignorant outsiders could understand the products of the departmental mandarins, images: Pixabay)

A little more often than now and then, some ruse, hoax, or stratagem upends academe. Recently, a small pod of researchers scandalized “cultural studies” by publishing, in prestigious journals, a plethora of counterfeit studies: make-believe research addressing preposterous issues such as the relation between the intimate anatomy of pets and the gender identities of their masters or the need for a feminist updating of Mein Kampf. Less spectacular exposés have occurred throughout the recent history of higher education, whether the famous Sokal hoax of the 1990s, which embarrassed the global scientific community, or the works of my own college roommate, a product of the Irish Boston immigrant community, who masqueraded for months as an enraged black poet. When the cover for such shams is eventually blown, the conservative press enjoys a feeding frenzy, railing against professors who, more often than not, draw their salaries from public funds. Is the story quite so simple? After all, even hard-core leftist professors should be clever enough to avoid looking ridiculous in the evening news. What does this recurrent phenomenon tell us about higher education—and about contemporary conservatism?

Probably the most widely observed law is that of unintended consequences. The donors, alumni, and commercial contractors who influence universities, many of whom drift to the conservative side of the political spectrum, may unintentionally create conditions that induce the kind of excesses exposed by satirizing hoaxers. Despite their reputation for leftist thinking, revenue-hungry colleges and universities spend much of their time trying to navigate around a cleft within American conservatism. Whether through public events such as Rotary Club or alumni association meetings or whether through a host of in-house documents—“mission statements,” “strategic plans,” and “vision statements”—that take long to write but attract only a few readers, campuses present themselves both as ivory towers in which noble thoughts find a safe haven and as factories stamping out the “human capital” required to ensure western dominance in a high-tech future. The first vision might be described as the philosophical conservatism of Cardinal Newman, the second, the establishment conservatism of Lee Iacocca or, if not Donald Trump, perhaps Tim Cook or Rex Tillerson.

Few college or university presidents have read Cardinal Newman. They find it easier, especially in difficult financial times, to opt for the production line version of conservatism. The donor queue, they recognize, is longer among CEOs than among philosophizing prelates. Eager to give conservative boosters what they think they want, campus leaders compensate for declining public support by seeking more students (or, as they prefer to say, “clients”), more tuition, and more output. Forgetting that Euro-American industry has a labor, social, and religious, as well as economic, history, they import into higher education a stripped-down version of the industrial model in the hope that producing students will convince the public that higher education is practical—i.e., that it evidences what cautious old Cardinal Newman discounted as “utility.” The conceptual instability of this approach is seen in mixed nomenclature within university propaganda. Incoming students are “clients” but the institutions go on to “produce” degree recipients. Industries, however, may “produce” goods to sell to clients, they do not “produce” clients.

What has all this to do with fake scholarship and academic bombast? The substitution of industrial-style conservatism for the idealistic conservatism of Newman—i.e., what Newman calls “the habit of pushing things up to their first principles”—produces knock-on, or secondary, effects that lead to the overproduction of absurdities. First comes the Balkanizing of comprehensive universities—schools that claim to cover most recognized disciplines—into an array of institutes, centers, and programs where much of the funding comes from outside supporters rather than from institutional budgets that are open to public scrutiny. Such centers offer an escape from the claustrophobia of traditional academic departments, yet they also must continuously seek support, please donors and grantors, and produce—whether what is produced is good, bad, scientific, ideological, or merely attention-getting. Mimicking their production-obsessed parent university, centers and institutes pump up a blimp-load of research from a thin tithe. In my own university, we have a swollen “water campus” that arose as a response to Hurricane Katrina but that is now something of a paradoxical joint habitat for academics supporting conservative “sportsmen” who want to preserve their endangered hunting grounds and for liberals hoping to make anxieties about climate change look more practical than apocalyptic.

Interacting with the rise of institutes is a pseudo-capitalist version of academic tribalism. Administrations impose industrial-style economic models on discipline-based departments, setting them against one another in the competition for resources. This arrangement encourages small groups of professors to band tightly together, to resist outside criticism, to develop in-house jargons, and to become ever more defensive, parochial, and, worse, elitist (it being impossible that ignorant outsiders could understand the products of the departmental mandarins). Academic journals, similarly, develop clienteles, cadres of reviewers, and, in a word, gangs. Fraud becomes easy for anyone even close to insider status; youngsters are easily corrupted by the promise of frequent publication opportunities in exchange for being a team player. Thus, an emphasis on academic products rather than ideas seems to fulfill a “conservative” mandate but leads to zaniness.

The scholarship singed by the recent spoof arose from the liberal arts rather than the “STEM” (or, worse, “TED”) disciplines. Science has become the approved template for measuring academic productivity. Cardinal Newman may stress the seeking of first principles, but in donor- and revenue-driven academe, “science” has become confused with “product” or “effect.” The sciences routinely produce studies with hundreds of co-authors, many of whom have never read the study that they are credited with writing, by way of ensuring that everyone looks productive. Including everyone also ensures that no one will criticize the published work. As the science-originated multi-author, multi-reviewer model spreads, syndicates—dare I say “conspiracies”?—arise within all the disciplines. Researchers who are also publishing scholars “referee” contributions for publishers whose success improves those referees’ publishing prospects. Such an arrangement is efficient but not truthful; it produces, per one of Henry Ford’s assembly lines, but it does not judge. It also replicates the industrialist-conservative ideal of voluntary self-regulation—an ideal that may not always work, as the costly Takata air bag recall showed. The primary values ingrained in the self-regulated academic publishing system are speed, loyalty, and conformity. The primary result: scholarship that is at its best when, as is often the case, no one reads it.

In considering any of the sometimes arcane, sometimes trivial doings behind the ivy-covered walls, the hard question “why should anyone care about this?” easily arises. Occasionally, the answer is obvious. A patient would be well-advised to think twice before popping one of the countless pills promoted on late-night television but tested on only a half-dozen prisoners and a tiny tribe of graduate assistants in order to ensure that a researcher earns tenure, that a corporate donor sees results, and that departmental productivity metrics are met. With regard to the more abstruse “products” of scholars in the liberal arts, a more theoretical, if more old-fashioned and somewhat humorously religious, question occurs. That question is: will there be work (or tasks or jobs) in heaven? If there are journals, studies, and other academic products in the great beyond, the supply line behind them is likely to be infinite and the need or demand, in so happy a place, minimal. St. Peter is less likely to pay for a subscription than to receive complimentary copies; the pressure to meet production quotas will be low. From St. Thomas More we have learned that the utopian throws into contrast the folly of what we regard as commonplace or normal. Presumably the scholars in the saintly academy will prize honesty rather than voluminousness and truth rather than metrics.

Kevin L. Cope is Robert and Rita Wetta Adams Professor of English Literature at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He is the founder and editor of 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, the Co-General Editor of ECCB: The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography, and the author or editor of dozens of books and articles. He received his doctorate in literature from Harvard University in 1983.



Bingham University Karu

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website
Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018
Download Bingham University Karu Information Bulletin

Quality, Moral Education
1. Introduction

Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria. Its founding fathers, visionaries within the various Executive Councils, as well academics of ECWA extraction, looked back to the golden age of mission education with its focus, purposefulness, and high quality. It was the desire for meeting the soaring need for not only quality, secular education, but education that recognizes and integrates the moral and spiritual values on which the Christian faith is founded which fueled its establishment. Recognizing the importance of the technological revolution of the 19th and 20th centuries, Bingham University is determined to build a technology-driven institution of the 21st century.

The University has had four (4) Vice Chancellors since inception. The Pioneer Vice Chancellor was Professor Aaron Gana of blessed memory from 2006 to 2007. He was succeeded by Professor Felix I. Anjorin also of blessed memory, from 2007 to 2013 . The third Vice Chancellor was Professor Leonard KursimFwa from 2013 to 2017, while the fourth Vice Chancellor is Professor William Barnabas Qurix, OFR 2018 onward.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-contentedness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose-driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).

Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’ (Mark 10:45). The motto emphasizes the type of knowledge and skills, which the university impact on its students. The ultimate goal is to produce graduates who would see themselves as a task force out to serve the society.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.

The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.

It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



Bingham University: Transform a person into Knowledge and skills driven, Christ centered Individual

Ag. Vice Chancellor, Prof. William B. Qurix, OFR, FNIA | Undisputed events testify, from those who conceived, designed, developed and even those that are operating Bingham University that God Himself is solidly building Bingham University. This is even more so as movement to …

Visit Bingham University website | Download Bingham University – Karu – Nasarawa State Newsletter vol.1 No. 6 2nd July 2018

Quality, Moral Tertiary Education In Nigeria
1. Preamble
Bingham University, established by the Evangelical Church Winning All (ECWA) in 2005 was conceived on the ruins of public universities in Nigeria.  As the name implies, the University was named after one of the trio of pioneer Sudan Interior Missionaries, Roland Victor Bingham whose vision along with those of other founding fathers desired to produce committed Christians in our institutions, including the University through which Christ-centred leaders would emerge.   The founding fathers intend to meet the soaring need for not only quality secular tertiary education but education that recognises and integrates moral and spiritual values in the face of degenerating social decadence in Nigerian University campuses.

2. Vision, Mission, Core values and Goal
The vision of Bingham University, Karu is to transform Nigeria into knowledge and skills – driven society (Prov. 29:18).
Our mission for accomplishing the vision is to produce men and women who will catalyze the revolution in self-reliance at all levels of a Godly society (1 Cor. 2:12-12).
TBingham University, Karuhe core values for Bingham University, Karu are Christ-centeredness, people-orientation, excellence, purpose -driven life and adaptability to a changing world (Rom. 12:2-3).
Bingham University’s goal is to produce total men and women equipped to affect their generation positively for Jesus Christ, serving humanity in ways that are glorifying to God and dignifying to humanity (Prov. 29:18).  Our motto is, ‘mission for service’.

3. Commencement of Academic Programs:  Temporary to Permanent Site
Academic programs of Bingham University began in May 2006 at the Jos ECWA Theological Seminary temporary site and moved to its present permanent site two years after, precisely in March 2008 to Karu – Nasarawa State – Nigeria at the outskirts of Abuja, the Federal Capital City.  Indeed the feat of moving to the permanent Principal Officers of Bingham University (from Left – Right: Liberian Pastor J.O. Aronsanyin. Bursar James Bako, Registrar Mr. S.S. Sule and Vice Chancellor Prof. Felix I. Anjorin) in a procession during the University’s convocationsite at such a brief moment of the University’s commencement is uncommon in the history of Nigerian Universities where many first and second generation government funded universities in the country have not fully moved to their permanent sites after decades of their existence.  To the glory of God, the virgin land of October 2006 with no single building has now been transformed into a beehive of academic, professorial and Christian activities, courtesy of successive ECWA leadership, members and friends of Bingham University, Karu.

4. Academic Programs and Accreditation
As with all other Nigerian Universities, Bingham University’s admissions are through the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) combined with a post-UTME screening exercise.
The University started with a faculty of Science and Technology (with programs in Biochemistry, Computer Science and later Microbiology and Industrial Chemistry), Faculty of Humanities, Social and Management Sciences (with programs in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, English Language, Mass Communication, Political Science and Sociology) and the College of Health Sciences (with programs in Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – MBBS, and later Human Anatomy and Physiology).

Bingham University, E-LibraryEnglish Language, Computer Science, Business Administration, Biochemistry, Accounting have full accreditation, while others have interim accreditation.
It is worthy of note, that Bingham University, Karu is unique in the history of tertiary education in Nigeria as one of the few Universities to begin with a College of Health Sciences from inception gaining accreditation for MB,BS program at pre-clinical and first clinical accreditation levels from the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN). Clinical studies have also commenced at Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos where students are at various advanced stages of their training.  The Accounting program also has full accreditation by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria (ICAN), exempting graduates of the Bingham University from the first five of seven parts of the ICAN certification examination, among other benefits. The advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria (APCON) has also given full professional accreditation to Bingham University Mass Communication programme.

Bingham University Circulation Desk5. Information and Communication Centre (ICT)
ICT development of the Students has a strategic focus in Bingham University. The University has in place a state of the art ICT centre with a student portal for integrated services developed and maintained by the versatile staff of the University’s Computer Science Department who offers uninterrupted service for the learning comfort of our students.

Bingham University Electronic Library6. Library Facilities
The University Library works in conjunction with the ICT Centre to provide the Electronic Library Services, giving the students and other staff users access to a wide range of academic resources, including the robust NUC virtual library.
Bingham University Management is constantly working in collaboration with her partners and friends at home and abroad to ensure the library is up to date at all times.

7. Students’ Welfare
From an initial intake of 124 students in May 2006, the University currently has a student population of about 2000 from all parts of Nigeria and beyond, pursuing their various programs.  All students are resident on the campus.  The University’s Management has out-sourced controlled catering services to both students and staff at affordable cost.  There are also modest sports and recreational facilities on campus for the physical fitness of students and staff.

The University has a comprehensive health centre at Karu that provides medical services to students and staff as well as the surrounding communities.  Currently, the centre provides immunization services to children in addition to family planning services to women from the surrounding villages as part of the institution’s corporate responsibility to its host community and those around.

8. Science Laboratory
The University host has equipped science laboratories instruction of students offering natural and applied science courses.

9. Chaplaincy
Bingham University runs a 24 hour Chaplaincy service with three Chaplains assisted by some lecturers to cater for the spiritual needs of the students.  A compulsory Bible Study Course holds for two hours every week from 100 to 300 level.  A pass in this course is a pre-requisite for graduating from Bingham University.  There are also compulsory Chapel hours on Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays and most Saturdays.  Students are also distributed into mentorship groups under dedicated staff to provide sound Christian mentoring.

Students are also encouraged and supported to build prayer cells with their roommates.  In addition, the Chaplains assisted by some staff conduct room-to-room evangelism once in a week to strengthen the faith of students as well as helping those who have not made their faith to do so in the Lord Jesus Christ.

10. Students’ Discipline
The University operates strict disciplinary tenets which are contained in the institution’s student handbook.  It prescribes behaviour and dress codes acceptable to the University and the consequences of committing infractions against the regulations,  In all, taken in conjunction with the efforts of the Chaplaincy, the regulations help not only to improve behaviour of students to become more disciplined but also to help them grow to be more like Christ.
Violations are met with appropriate sanctions always after a fair hearing is given to the alleged offender.

Main Entrance Gate of the Bingham University, Karu11. Security
The University appreciates God for being its security.  Efforts have however been made to put in place a structured security system with measures to secure life and property on the campus. A Police station is under construction on the campus.
Plans are already going on to build a block fence around the University mass of land 259.88 hectares to further enhance security.

12. Success Story
Bingham University Karu within six years of its commencement of academic activities has graduated three sets of students who excelled in their various academic courses of studies.  The University is most grateful to God for turning out graduates, men and women who have not only done well academically, but have grown both Pro‐Chancellor/Chairman of Bingham University Gen. Martin Luther Agwai, Chairman Board of Trustees Ass. Prof. Basil Nwosu and Etsu Karu/Chancellor of the University Pharm. Luka Panya Baba in a processionphysically and spiritually as children of God who will continue to hold integrity as their watch word in the midst of a perverse society. We expect them to shine for God in their future endeavours by God’s grace.
The University also held its first convocation ceremony in February 2012 where certificates were presented to the graduates.  The occasion also featured the presentation of honorary degrees to some distinguished Nigerians whose exemplary godly life styles have been a model to the younger generation.

13. Conclusion
The evolution of private Universities in Nigeria including Bingham University, Karu has contributed immensely to the country’s human capital development.  The efforts of private Universities, especially Christian faith-based Universities in providing quality education in the face of over-whelming national challenges should attract the Federal and State Government support through the provision of grants from the Education Tax Fund to motivate private Universities to continue to complement government’s human capital development efforts in the country

CONTACT US – http://www.binghamuni.edu.ng/index.php


The Vice Chancellor,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: vc@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Registrar,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: registrar@binghamuni.edu.ng


The Public Relations Officer,
Bingham University,
P.M.B 005,
KM 26 Abuja-Keffi Expressway Kodope,
Karu, Nasarawa State.
E-mail: pro@binghamuni.edu.ng


For further inquiry:
E-mail: webmaster@binghamuni.edu.ng



ECWA FOUNDERS’ WEEK 2017: Nov. 28 to Dec. 4, 2016

by Sunday Bwanhot, ECWA Chicago, Connect via bwanhots@gmail.com | Every year ECWA and SIM set aside a week to celebrate Founders’ Week.

What is Founders’ Week?

In 1893 the three young men Walter Gowans, Thomas Kent and Rowland Bingham (pictured above) answered the call of God as missionaries and set sail from America to Europe and from there to Lagos, Nigeria, arriving on Dec. 3 1893 with the sole goal of taking the Gospel to the Soudan (the name given to the whole area bordering Northern Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Northern Cameroun, Sudan etc.). This was a great sacrifice and we cannot thank God enough for calling these young men, nor can we thank them enough for answering God’s call because of their love for lost people they have never seen.

Both Walter Gowans and Thomas Kent died within the first year of their ministry in Nigeria without seeing one soul come to the Lord. The Lord kept Rowland Bingham alive who returned to the US and mobilized other missionaries to go back to Africa with him. The result was the planting of an SIM church which was indigenized in 1956 and renamed ECWA. ECWA today has more than 7, 000 churches in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Chad, Gambia, Niger Republic, Togo, USA, Cameroun, Benin, Malawi, Mali, Zambia, Kenya, Ghana, Burundi, UK, Israel and a Prayer Cell in the Philippians. The goal remains to take the Gospel to all parts of the world.

Pray:

  • Thank God for all those that God used in the past to proclaim the gospel through SIM/ECWA.
  • Thank God for all those that God is using today to continue in the proclamation of the Gospel through SIM / ECWA.
  • Pray that we will all imbibe the sacrifice of the pioneer missionaries and have love and passion for those still living in darkness and step out to do our part no matter the cost.

Pray that our generation will not be at ease but will step out irrespective of our denomination, race, social and economic status to proclaim the Good News of salvation in Christ alone.

 Rev. Sunday Bwanhot is a minister at ECWA Chicago and their ministry can be summarized as follows:
1. Sunday minister to Churches by training and equipping them and providing resources so that they can effectively minister to the immigrant people around them. We also bring pastors from different backgrounds and churches to fellowship together and learn from each other.

2. Direct Ministry: Sunday minister to immigrants directly through a wide range of activities: Befriend and help them settle in America; provide spiritual guidance, enfold them into existing churches or get them to start a Bible study group, counseling, visitation, hospitality etc. We planted a Church in Chicago and also lead the International Couples Fellowship – a ministry that ministers to immigrant couples as well as single young adults.

 



The Biblical Meaning of Clothing

Robert Covolo | It takes on special significance throughout the arc of Scripture.

Before becoming a PhD candidate at Fuller Theological Seminary, I served for 12 years at a church in Long Beach, California. A number of my congregants worked in the fashion industry. From them I learned that programs on fashion—fashion design, merchandising, and a body of literature called fashion theory—were popping up all over.

When I looked for a Christian response to the fashion industry, I didn’t find anything. There are books on Christianity and film, Christianity and literature, Christianity and psychology, but I couldn’t find anything on Christianity and fashion.

Dutch theologian Abraham Kuyper famously said, “There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry: ‘Mine!’ ” Like Kuyper, I want to understand every aspect of human life in relationship to Christ. This set me on a quest to understand the fashion industry and emerging fashion studies.

The Bible doesn’t directly address fashion, which today refers to the rapid interplay of clothing in consumer societies. But the Bible has a surprising amount to say about clothing. Right from the beginning, after the Fall, Adam and Eve became aware of being “undressed.” Then God provides for them in their nakedness. Theologians call this a protoevangelium—literally a “first gospel.” The gift of clothing reveals a God who meets us in our shameful, sinful condition and covers us through a sacrificial death.

Clothing takes on special significance in the story of Joseph; in the way the prophets Samuel, Isaiah, and Jeremiah delivered their message; and at the Transfiguration, where Jesus appeared in clothing that “became dazzling white, whiter than anyone in the world could bleach them” (Mark 9:3). Luke 12:27–28 tells us God dresses the flowers of the field, more splendorous than Solomon in his fine dress. If that is how God clothes the fields, how much more does he care about clothing us?

Modesty is not the locus of biblical teaching on clothing.

The Bible also addresses modesty, and therefore, we must seriously consider it. But modesty is not the locus of biblical teaching on clothing. After all, Esther won a beauty contest to rescue her people. Conversely, any of us can wear modest clothing and still lack the generosity that Paul puts forward as the end game of modesty (1 Tim. 2). So here’s a test to see if we are practicing biblical modesty: Do we reserve resources to bless those less fortunate? Or do we spend all of our resources on ourselves?

Further, as we are obligated to care for others, we might spend more money on high-quality clothes, as cheap clothing notoriously relies on sweatshops and child labor. And consider the elaborate nature of the priestly clothing detailed in Exodus 28; the celebrated gold-laced bridal gown in Psalm 45:13–14; and the Proverbs 31 woman, who dresses her household in scarlet. From these and other texts, we learn that the Christian story embraces the festive, fine, and elaborate dress associated with fashion.

To truly engage fashion as Christians, we need to move beyond explicit verses about dress and examine the underlying values that are reinforced by fashion. Some of these values are good. It is no accident that modern fashion has arisen alongside suffrage and other aspects of democracy. The two cities known best for fashion—New York and Paris—are major cities in countries that have had powerful democratic revolutions. If we all get to choose what to wear, we are already practicing a form of voting for the public decorum.

But not all values put forth by fashion are reconcilable with Christianity. One of the parasites that feeds and fuels fashion is late-modern expressionism. I’m talking here not about the value of expressing yourself, but about making self-expression into an entire way of life. As Catholic philosopher Charles Taylor pointed out, self-expression has become the highest good for many people, pursued with a religious zeal. This new form of late-modern Romanticism teaches us that to not “follow your heart” is to diminish our humanity.

Clearly such expressionism is at odds with the Christian faith. Jesus calls us to deny ourselves, not pursue ourselves (Matt. 16:24). Self-denial, not self-expression, is at the heart of Christianity. Again, here is an opportunity for Christians to look beyond concerns about scanty dress to consider how we might make sacrifices in our choices for the sake of others.

Beyond this, Thomas Aquinas provides one more model for engaging clothing. He believed we have a moral obligation to compose our outward manners—including our dress—in light of the person we are addressing, the company we are with, the business we are pursuing, and the place we are in. He claimed that a truly virtuous life includes the art of savoir faire—“a sense of occasion discerning differences of situation”—and that this should inform the clothing we wear. May we rise to the occasion.

Robert Covolo is an ordained pastor and a dual PhD student at Fuller Theological Seminary and VU University–Amsterdam. His dissertation (under William Dyrness) is on fashion theory and theology.

 



ECWA USA DCC National Conference in Louisville, KY

ECWA USA DCC National Conference in Louisville, KY
Conference Hotel Reservation Information
 
LOCATION :  LEGACY CENTER HOTEL, SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
 
ADDRESS: 2825 LEXINGTON ROAD, LOUISVILLE, KY 40206
 
TELEPHONE: (502) 736 0600 (Call-in Number for Individual Reservations)
 
RATE: Standard Rooms – $60.00 per night + Tax
          Jr. Suites             – $70.00 per night + Tax
          Double/Regular Suites (Two-bed Suites and the Family Suites) –  $80.00 per night + Tax
 
ROOM DESCRIPTIONS
  • Standard Room consists of a Sealy Plush queen or king size bed. Writing desk, sitting area, television, refrigerator, and coffee machine.
  • Junior Suite consists of a Sealy Plush queen bed. A full size pull-out sofa, writing desk, television, refrigerator, and coffee machine.
  • Double consists of two Sealy Plush queen size beds in a spacious room. Writing desk, television, refrigerator, and coffee machine.
  • Suites and 2-Bed Suites consist of two rooms separated by a short hallway with bathroom.
  • Suites have one bedroom with a Sealy Plush queen or king size bed. Writing desk, and television. Suites have a living room with a full size pull-out sofa or
  • 2-Bed Suites have a bedroom with another queen bed. This second room in either type suite includes a writing desk, television, complimentary coffee area, sink, refrigerator, and coffee machine.
CALLING FOR RESERVATION
 Please call ONLY (502) 736 0600 for reservation. Our group name is ‘ECWA USA Conference’.
Deadline for reservation is Tuesday June 21st, 2016.

CHECK IN: Check in time is from 4PM on Thursday July 21, 2016.

CHECK OUT time is by 12 noon on Sunday July 24, 2016.

HOTEL POLICIES
  • Hotel is a Non-Smoking property
  • No Alcoholic beverages on property

ADDITIONAL CHARGES

  • $10 per day for requested roll-a-ways or pack and play cribs.
  • $15 per person per day for extra person charge, over standard room capacity, applies to additional guests in room, 11 years or older.

INTERNET

  • Free Wi-Fi internet in every room & throughout the hotel.
  • Complimentary use of two computers in the lobby with internet access.

AMENITIES

  • Recreation and Fitness Center is not open on Sundays
  • Appropriate attire is required for the pool, recreation and fitness center.  Call for more information
  • 25 meter indoor pool
  • Indoor running track
  • 3 Racquetball courts
  • In-room iron and ironing board
  • Startbucks coffee machine in the Lobby
  • Fast-food & sit-down restaurants are within a few miles from the hotel
  • Dry and Wet Sauna
  • Full weight-room
  • 2 indoor basketball courts
  • Keurig coffee machines in every room
  • Ice & Vending machines on several floors
For additional information or assistance please contact:
       Rev. Thomas Maijama'a, Host Pastor: 267-421-8360;
       Rev. Jean de Dieu Nzeyimana, Host Pastor: 502-640-8482;
       Elder Josiah Osasona, Chairman National Conference Committee: 404-735-3452;
       Elder Jide Omotinugbon, Chairman Local Organizing Committee: 502-435-2196;

We look forward to a great time of fellowship with you and your family.
May The Lord grant all travelers journey mercies.



Nigerian bishop to lecture on religion, development and democracy in Africa on October 29

by Elizabeth Rankin, University of Notre Dame, Kellogg Institute for International Studies, 574-631-9184, erankin3@nd.edu

Bishop Matthew H. Kukah, a noted Nigerian advocate for justice, democracy and human development, will speak at the University of Notre Dame on Oct. 29 (Thursday). His lecture, “Religion, Human Development and Democracy in Africa: Lessons from Nigeria,” is sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. Free and open to the public, the lecture will be held at 4 p.m. in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium.

A respected scholar as well as the bishop of the Diocese of Sokoto, Nigeria, Kukah has played an active role in Nigerian civil society and is well-known in Africa and beyond as a champion of respectful Christian-Muslim relations.

He has served on Nigeria’s Truth Commission, the Political Reform Conference for Nigeria and the country’s Electoral Reform Committee and helped to negotiate an end to the Shell-Ogoni conflict in Nigeria’s delta region. He chaired the Committee on Interreligious Dialogue in Nigeria and West Africa and was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI as a member of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue.

In his lecture, Kukah will discuss how Christian and Islamic religious institutions and religious beliefs have promoted or inhibited integral human development and how religious institutions or universities might better promote such development.

During his visit to Notre Dame, Kukah will also take part in the panel “Christianity, Islam and Liberal Democracy: Lessons from Sub-Saharan Africa” at 4 p.m. Tuesday (Oct. 27) in C103 Hesburgh Center. He will be joined on the panel by Kellogg Faculty Fellow Rev. Robert Dowd, C.S.C., assistant professor of political science and director of the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity; Sara Sievers, associate dean for policy and practice in the Keough School of Global Affairs; and Ebrahim Moosa, professor of Islamic studies, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and Department of History.

Kukah has written widely on democracy, religion and politics in Nigeria. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and has been a senior Rhodes fellow at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, and an Edward Mason Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

The Kellogg Institute for International Studies, part of the University of Notre Dame’s new Keough School of Global Affairs, is an interdisciplinary community of scholars and students from across the University and around the world that promotes research, provides educational opportunities and builds linkages related to two topics critical to our world: democracy and human development.

Contact: Elizabeth Rankin, Kellogg Institute, 574-631-9184, erankin3@nd.edu